Use of virtual patient software to assess student confidence and ability in communication skills and virtual patient impression

A mixed-methods approach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and purpose: Knowledge related to the use of virtual patients (VP) in pharmacy education is limited in relation to student satisfaction with this learning technique. This project aimed to assess students' confidence and impressions in using their communication skills with a VP and to evaluate their skills using this technology. Educational activity and setting: This explanatory mixed-methods study was conducted with first-year doctor of pharmacy students. Fourteen survey items that addressed confidence in student abilities and VP impressions were analyzed. Mann-Whitney U tests were conducted to compare pre- and post- scores. Student reflections were reviewed to obtain primary themes and concerns. Descriptive statistics were used for student grades. Findings: Out of 205 students, 203 completed the pre-survey and 163 completed the post-survey. Responses regarding pre-post confidence indicated statistically significant improvement (p < 0.001) for 8 of 10 survey items as follows: understand history taking, conduct an organized interview, elicit subjective information, ask follow-up questions, ask questions related to severity, document subjective data, document objective data, and organize an interview. Regarding their impressions toward VPs, student responses were improved and statistically significant (p < 0.001) for 1 of 4 survey items (tools are easy to use). Forty-two students stressed the need to improve their written communication skills in the self-reflection. The average grade for subjective data was 31.48% and for objective data was 93.66%. This VP program improved student confidence in their verbal and written communication skills despite low subjective data scores.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)710-718
Number of pages9
JournalCurrents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

Fingerprint

Aptitude
Software
Communication
Students
Pharmacy Education
Interviews
Pharmacy Students
Nonparametric Statistics
Surveys and Questionnaires
Learning
Education
Technology
Statistics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

@article{28915d42dc2a40a19f38f20c07b1487c,
title = "Use of virtual patient software to assess student confidence and ability in communication skills and virtual patient impression: A mixed-methods approach",
abstract = "Background and purpose: Knowledge related to the use of virtual patients (VP) in pharmacy education is limited in relation to student satisfaction with this learning technique. This project aimed to assess students' confidence and impressions in using their communication skills with a VP and to evaluate their skills using this technology. Educational activity and setting: This explanatory mixed-methods study was conducted with first-year doctor of pharmacy students. Fourteen survey items that addressed confidence in student abilities and VP impressions were analyzed. Mann-Whitney U tests were conducted to compare pre- and post- scores. Student reflections were reviewed to obtain primary themes and concerns. Descriptive statistics were used for student grades. Findings: Out of 205 students, 203 completed the pre-survey and 163 completed the post-survey. Responses regarding pre-post confidence indicated statistically significant improvement (p < 0.001) for 8 of 10 survey items as follows: understand history taking, conduct an organized interview, elicit subjective information, ask follow-up questions, ask questions related to severity, document subjective data, document objective data, and organize an interview. Regarding their impressions toward VPs, student responses were improved and statistically significant (p < 0.001) for 1 of 4 survey items (tools are easy to use). Forty-two students stressed the need to improve their written communication skills in the self-reflection. The average grade for subjective data was 31.48{\%} and for objective data was 93.66{\%}. This VP program improved student confidence in their verbal and written communication skills despite low subjective data scores.",
author = "Nancy Hart and Christina Spivey and Christa George",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.cptl.2019.03.009",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "710--718",
journal = "Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning",
issn = "1877-1297",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of virtual patient software to assess student confidence and ability in communication skills and virtual patient impression

T2 - A mixed-methods approach

AU - Hart, Nancy

AU - Spivey, Christina

AU - George, Christa

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - Background and purpose: Knowledge related to the use of virtual patients (VP) in pharmacy education is limited in relation to student satisfaction with this learning technique. This project aimed to assess students' confidence and impressions in using their communication skills with a VP and to evaluate their skills using this technology. Educational activity and setting: This explanatory mixed-methods study was conducted with first-year doctor of pharmacy students. Fourteen survey items that addressed confidence in student abilities and VP impressions were analyzed. Mann-Whitney U tests were conducted to compare pre- and post- scores. Student reflections were reviewed to obtain primary themes and concerns. Descriptive statistics were used for student grades. Findings: Out of 205 students, 203 completed the pre-survey and 163 completed the post-survey. Responses regarding pre-post confidence indicated statistically significant improvement (p < 0.001) for 8 of 10 survey items as follows: understand history taking, conduct an organized interview, elicit subjective information, ask follow-up questions, ask questions related to severity, document subjective data, document objective data, and organize an interview. Regarding their impressions toward VPs, student responses were improved and statistically significant (p < 0.001) for 1 of 4 survey items (tools are easy to use). Forty-two students stressed the need to improve their written communication skills in the self-reflection. The average grade for subjective data was 31.48% and for objective data was 93.66%. This VP program improved student confidence in their verbal and written communication skills despite low subjective data scores.

AB - Background and purpose: Knowledge related to the use of virtual patients (VP) in pharmacy education is limited in relation to student satisfaction with this learning technique. This project aimed to assess students' confidence and impressions in using their communication skills with a VP and to evaluate their skills using this technology. Educational activity and setting: This explanatory mixed-methods study was conducted with first-year doctor of pharmacy students. Fourteen survey items that addressed confidence in student abilities and VP impressions were analyzed. Mann-Whitney U tests were conducted to compare pre- and post- scores. Student reflections were reviewed to obtain primary themes and concerns. Descriptive statistics were used for student grades. Findings: Out of 205 students, 203 completed the pre-survey and 163 completed the post-survey. Responses regarding pre-post confidence indicated statistically significant improvement (p < 0.001) for 8 of 10 survey items as follows: understand history taking, conduct an organized interview, elicit subjective information, ask follow-up questions, ask questions related to severity, document subjective data, document objective data, and organize an interview. Regarding their impressions toward VPs, student responses were improved and statistically significant (p < 0.001) for 1 of 4 survey items (tools are easy to use). Forty-two students stressed the need to improve their written communication skills in the self-reflection. The average grade for subjective data was 31.48% and for objective data was 93.66%. This VP program improved student confidence in their verbal and written communication skills despite low subjective data scores.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85063293832&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85063293832&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.cptl.2019.03.009

DO - 10.1016/j.cptl.2019.03.009

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 710

EP - 718

JO - Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning

JF - Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning

SN - 1877-1297

IS - 7

ER -