Using bibliometrics to analyze the state of academic productivity in US pediatric surgery training programs

Nidhi Desai, Laura V. Veras, Ankush Gosain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Common Program Requirements state that faculty must establish and maintain an environment of inquiry and scholarship. Bibliometrics, the statistical analysis of written publications, assesses scientific productivity and impact. The goal of this study was to understand the state of scholarship at Pediatric Surgery training programs. Methods: Following IRB approval, Scopus was used to generate bibliometric profiles for US Pediatric Surgery training programs and faculty. Statistical analyses were performed. Results: Information was obtained for 430 surgeons (105 female) from 48 US training programs. The mean lifetime h-index/surgeon for programs was 14.4 +/− 4.7 (6 programs above 1 SD, 9 programs below 1 SD). The mean 5-year h-index/surgeon for programs was 3.92 +/− 1.5 (7 programs above 1 SD, 8 programs below 1 SD). Programs accredited after 2000 had a lower lifetime h-index than those accredited before 2000 (p = 0.0378). Female surgeons had a lower lifetime h-index (p < 0.0001), 5-year h-index (p = 0.0049), and m-quotient (p < 0.0001) compared to males. Mean lifetime h-index increased with academic rank (p < 0.0001), with no gender differences beyond the assistant professor rank (p = NS). Conclusion: Variability was identified based on institution, gender, and rank. This information can be used for benchmarking the academic productivity of faculty and programs and as an adjunct in promotion/tenure decisions. Type of Study: Original Research. Level of Evidence: n/a.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1098-1104
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of pediatric surgery
Volume53
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

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Bibliometrics
Pediatrics
Education
Graduate Medical Education
Benchmarking
Accreditation
Research Ethics Committees
Publications
Surgeons
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Using bibliometrics to analyze the state of academic productivity in US pediatric surgery training programs. / Desai, Nidhi; Veras, Laura V.; Gosain, Ankush.

In: Journal of pediatric surgery, Vol. 53, No. 6, 01.06.2018, p. 1098-1104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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