Using course survey feedback to encourage learning and concept application in a self-care and nonprescription medications course

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To improve student application of course content and learning in a self-care and non-prescription medications course. Design. A precourse survey was administered to students to determine confidence in their ability to advise patients about nonprescription medications and to identify what they would like to learn in the course. Data gathered from the precourse survey was then used to modify course content. A postcourse survey was conducted to encourage students to reflect on course concepts and apply them in practice or when advising friends and family members about nonprescription drugs and self-care. Assessment. Comparison of precourse and postcourse responses showed an increase in students' confidence in their ability to provide nonprescription medication advice. Postcourse qualitative responses described student application of class concepts in providing self-care education and advice. Course and course director evaluations were positive. Conclusion. Course surveys can be a useful strategy for encouraging students to think about how they may practically apply course concepts, bridging the gap between theory and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number153
JournalAmerican journal of pharmaceutical education
Volume73
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Fingerprint

Self Care
medication
Learning
Students
learning
Aptitude
student
Nonprescription Drugs
class concept
confidence
Surveys and Questionnaires
ability
Education
family member
director
drug
evaluation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective. To improve student application of course content and learning in a self-care and non-prescription medications course. Design. A precourse survey was administered to students to determine confidence in their ability to advise patients about nonprescription medications and to identify what they would like to learn in the course. Data gathered from the precourse survey was then used to modify course content. A postcourse survey was conducted to encourage students to reflect on course concepts and apply them in practice or when advising friends and family members about nonprescription drugs and self-care. Assessment. Comparison of precourse and postcourse responses showed an increase in students' confidence in their ability to provide nonprescription medication advice. Postcourse qualitative responses described student application of class concepts in providing self-care education and advice. Course and course director evaluations were positive. Conclusion. Course surveys can be a useful strategy for encouraging students to think about how they may practically apply course concepts, bridging the gap between theory and practice.",
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