Using isothiocyanate excretion as a biological marker of Brassica vegetable consumption in epidemiological studies

Evaluating the sources of variability

Jay Fowke, Jed W. Fahey, Katherine K. Stephenson, James R. Hebert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Brassica vegetable consumption (e.g. broccoli) leads to excretion of isothiocyanates (ITC) in urine. We evaluated the consistency of ITC as a biomarker for dietary Brassica vegetable consumption across the types of vegetables and methods of preparation used in Western societies, and across consumption levels. Design: A single-armed behavioural intervention with duplicate baseline assessment and post-intervention assessment. Urinary ITC excretion and estrogen metabolites were measured from 24-hour urine samples. Dietary intake was measured by a 24-hour recall. Setting: The behavioural intervention facilitated daily Brassica intake among participants by providing peer support, food preparation instruction, guided practice in a teaching kitchen, and other information. Subjects: Thirty-four healthy free-living postmenopausal women who recently had a negative screening mammogram at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. Results: Urinary ITC excretion and total Brassica intake followed the same pattern over the intervention. The ITC biomarker significantly predicted Brassica intake when Brassica consumption averaged about 100 g day-1, but not when Brassica consumption averaged about 200 g day-1. Urinary ITC levels were somewhat higher when more raw vegetables were consumed as compared to lightly cooked vegetables, while the types of Brassica consumed appeared to have only a small, non-significant effect on urinary ITC levels. Conclusion: Urinary ITC excretion would be a good exposure biomarker among populations regularly consuming a vegetable serving/day, but may be less accurate among populations with greater intake levels or a wide range of cooking practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)837-846
Number of pages10
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume4
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jul 4 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Isothiocyanates
Brassica
Vegetables
Epidemiologic Studies
Biomarkers
Urine
isothiocyanic acid
Cooking
Population
Teaching
Estrogens
Food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Using isothiocyanate excretion as a biological marker of Brassica vegetable consumption in epidemiological studies : Evaluating the sources of variability. / Fowke, Jay; Fahey, Jed W.; Stephenson, Katherine K.; Hebert, James R.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 4, No. 3, 04.07.2001, p. 837-846.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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