Using the Phenogen website for 'in silico' analysis of morphine-induced analgesia: Identifying candidate genes

Paula L. Hoffman, Beth Bennett, Laura M. Saba, Sanjiv V. Bhave, Phyllis J. Carosone-Link, Cheryl K. Hornbaker, Katerina J. Kechris, Robert W. Williams, Boris Tabakoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The identification of genes that contribute to polygenic (complex) behavioral phenotypes is a key goal of current genetic research. One approach to this goal is to combine gene expression information with genetic information, i.e. to map chromosomal regions that regulate gene expression levels. This approach has been termed 'genetical genomics', and, when used in conjunction with the identification of genomic regions (QTLs) that regulate the complex physiological trait under investigation, provides a strong basis for candidate gene discovery. In this paper, we describe the implementation of the genetical genomic/phenotypic approach to identify candidate genes for sensitivity to the analgesic effect of morphine in BXD recombinant inbred mice. Our analysis was performed 'in silico', using an online interactive resource called PhenoGen (http://phenogen.ucdenver.edu). We describe in detail the use of this resource, which identified a set of candidate genes, some of whose products regulate the cellular localization and activity of the mu opiate receptor. The results demonstrate how PhenoGen can be used to identify a novel set of genes that can be further investigated for their potential role in pain, morphine analgesia and/or morphine tolerance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)393-404
Number of pages12
JournalAddiction Biology
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

Fingerprint

Computer Simulation
Analgesia
Morphine
Genes
Gene Expression
Genetic Research
mu Opioid Receptor
Genetic Association Studies
Opioid Receptors
Genomics
Analgesics
Phenotype
Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Hoffman, P. L., Bennett, B., Saba, L. M., Bhave, S. V., Carosone-Link, P. J., Hornbaker, C. K., ... Tabakoff, B. (2011). Using the Phenogen website for 'in silico' analysis of morphine-induced analgesia: Identifying candidate genes. Addiction Biology, 16(3), 393-404. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1369-1600.2010.00254.x

Using the Phenogen website for 'in silico' analysis of morphine-induced analgesia : Identifying candidate genes. / Hoffman, Paula L.; Bennett, Beth; Saba, Laura M.; Bhave, Sanjiv V.; Carosone-Link, Phyllis J.; Hornbaker, Cheryl K.; Kechris, Katerina J.; Williams, Robert W.; Tabakoff, Boris.

In: Addiction Biology, Vol. 16, No. 3, 01.07.2011, p. 393-404.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoffman, PL, Bennett, B, Saba, LM, Bhave, SV, Carosone-Link, PJ, Hornbaker, CK, Kechris, KJ, Williams, RW & Tabakoff, B 2011, 'Using the Phenogen website for 'in silico' analysis of morphine-induced analgesia: Identifying candidate genes', Addiction Biology, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 393-404. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1369-1600.2010.00254.x
Hoffman, Paula L. ; Bennett, Beth ; Saba, Laura M. ; Bhave, Sanjiv V. ; Carosone-Link, Phyllis J. ; Hornbaker, Cheryl K. ; Kechris, Katerina J. ; Williams, Robert W. ; Tabakoff, Boris. / Using the Phenogen website for 'in silico' analysis of morphine-induced analgesia : Identifying candidate genes. In: Addiction Biology. 2011 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 393-404.
@article{12255788754a4f448ff33df54ec989c2,
title = "Using the Phenogen website for 'in silico' analysis of morphine-induced analgesia: Identifying candidate genes",
abstract = "The identification of genes that contribute to polygenic (complex) behavioral phenotypes is a key goal of current genetic research. One approach to this goal is to combine gene expression information with genetic information, i.e. to map chromosomal regions that regulate gene expression levels. This approach has been termed 'genetical genomics', and, when used in conjunction with the identification of genomic regions (QTLs) that regulate the complex physiological trait under investigation, provides a strong basis for candidate gene discovery. In this paper, we describe the implementation of the genetical genomic/phenotypic approach to identify candidate genes for sensitivity to the analgesic effect of morphine in BXD recombinant inbred mice. Our analysis was performed 'in silico', using an online interactive resource called PhenoGen (http://phenogen.ucdenver.edu). We describe in detail the use of this resource, which identified a set of candidate genes, some of whose products regulate the cellular localization and activity of the mu opiate receptor. The results demonstrate how PhenoGen can be used to identify a novel set of genes that can be further investigated for their potential role in pain, morphine analgesia and/or morphine tolerance.",
author = "Hoffman, {Paula L.} and Beth Bennett and Saba, {Laura M.} and Bhave, {Sanjiv V.} and Carosone-Link, {Phyllis J.} and Hornbaker, {Cheryl K.} and Kechris, {Katerina J.} and Williams, {Robert W.} and Boris Tabakoff",
year = "2011",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1369-1600.2010.00254.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "393--404",
journal = "Addiction Biology",
issn = "1355-6215",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using the Phenogen website for 'in silico' analysis of morphine-induced analgesia

T2 - Identifying candidate genes

AU - Hoffman, Paula L.

AU - Bennett, Beth

AU - Saba, Laura M.

AU - Bhave, Sanjiv V.

AU - Carosone-Link, Phyllis J.

AU - Hornbaker, Cheryl K.

AU - Kechris, Katerina J.

AU - Williams, Robert W.

AU - Tabakoff, Boris

PY - 2011/7/1

Y1 - 2011/7/1

N2 - The identification of genes that contribute to polygenic (complex) behavioral phenotypes is a key goal of current genetic research. One approach to this goal is to combine gene expression information with genetic information, i.e. to map chromosomal regions that regulate gene expression levels. This approach has been termed 'genetical genomics', and, when used in conjunction with the identification of genomic regions (QTLs) that regulate the complex physiological trait under investigation, provides a strong basis for candidate gene discovery. In this paper, we describe the implementation of the genetical genomic/phenotypic approach to identify candidate genes for sensitivity to the analgesic effect of morphine in BXD recombinant inbred mice. Our analysis was performed 'in silico', using an online interactive resource called PhenoGen (http://phenogen.ucdenver.edu). We describe in detail the use of this resource, which identified a set of candidate genes, some of whose products regulate the cellular localization and activity of the mu opiate receptor. The results demonstrate how PhenoGen can be used to identify a novel set of genes that can be further investigated for their potential role in pain, morphine analgesia and/or morphine tolerance.

AB - The identification of genes that contribute to polygenic (complex) behavioral phenotypes is a key goal of current genetic research. One approach to this goal is to combine gene expression information with genetic information, i.e. to map chromosomal regions that regulate gene expression levels. This approach has been termed 'genetical genomics', and, when used in conjunction with the identification of genomic regions (QTLs) that regulate the complex physiological trait under investigation, provides a strong basis for candidate gene discovery. In this paper, we describe the implementation of the genetical genomic/phenotypic approach to identify candidate genes for sensitivity to the analgesic effect of morphine in BXD recombinant inbred mice. Our analysis was performed 'in silico', using an online interactive resource called PhenoGen (http://phenogen.ucdenver.edu). We describe in detail the use of this resource, which identified a set of candidate genes, some of whose products regulate the cellular localization and activity of the mu opiate receptor. The results demonstrate how PhenoGen can be used to identify a novel set of genes that can be further investigated for their potential role in pain, morphine analgesia and/or morphine tolerance.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79959854518&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79959854518&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2010.00254.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2010.00254.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 21054686

AN - SCOPUS:79959854518

VL - 16

SP - 393

EP - 404

JO - Addiction Biology

JF - Addiction Biology

SN - 1355-6215

IS - 3

ER -