Vaccination against the M protein of Streptococcus pyogenes prevents death after influenza virus

S. pyogenes super-infection

Joshua M. Klonoski, Heather R. Hurtig, Brian A. Juber, Margaret J. Schuneman, Thomas E. Bickett, Joshua M. Svendsen, Brandon Burum, Thomas A. Penfound, Grigoriy Sereda, James Dale, Michael S. Chaussee, Victor C. Huber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Influenza virus infections are associated with a significant number of illnesses and deaths on an annual basis. Many of the deaths are due to complications from secondary bacterial invaders, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pyogenes. The β-hemolytic bacteria S. pyogenes colonizes both skin and respiratory surfaces, and frequently presents clinically as strep throat or impetigo. However, when these bacteria gain access to normally sterile sites, they can cause deadly diseases including sepsis, necrotizing fasciitis, and pneumonia. We previously developed a model of influenza virus:. S. pyogenes super-infection, which we used to demonstrate that vaccination against influenza virus can limit deaths associated with a secondary bacterial infection, but this protection was not complete. In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of a vaccine that targets the M protein of S. pyogenes to determine whether immunity toward the bacteria alone would allow the host to survive an influenza virus:. S. pyogenes super-infection. Our data demonstrate that vaccination against the M protein induces IgG antibodies, in particular those of the IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes, and that these antibodies can interact with macrophages. Ultimately, this vaccine-induced immunity eliminated death within our influenza virus:. S. pyogenes super-infection model, despite the fact that all M protein-vaccinated mice showed signs of illness following influenza virus inoculation. These findings identify immunity against bacteria as an important component of protection against influenza virus:bacteria super-infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5241-5249
Number of pages9
JournalVaccine
Volume32
Issue number40
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 8 2014

Fingerprint

Streptococcus pyogenes
Orthomyxoviridae
Vaccination
vaccination
death
Infection
Bacteria
Proteins
bacteria
proteins
Immunity
immunity
Vaccines
Immunoglobulin G
Impetigo
vaccines
Necrotizing Fasciitis
Haemophilus influenzae
sepsis (infection)
Streptococcus pneumoniae

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • veterinary(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Klonoski, J. M., Hurtig, H. R., Juber, B. A., Schuneman, M. J., Bickett, T. E., Svendsen, J. M., ... Huber, V. C. (2014). Vaccination against the M protein of Streptococcus pyogenes prevents death after influenza virus: S. pyogenes super-infection. Vaccine, 32(40), 5241-5249. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.06.093

Vaccination against the M protein of Streptococcus pyogenes prevents death after influenza virus : S. pyogenes super-infection. / Klonoski, Joshua M.; Hurtig, Heather R.; Juber, Brian A.; Schuneman, Margaret J.; Bickett, Thomas E.; Svendsen, Joshua M.; Burum, Brandon; Penfound, Thomas A.; Sereda, Grigoriy; Dale, James; Chaussee, Michael S.; Huber, Victor C.

In: Vaccine, Vol. 32, No. 40, 08.09.2014, p. 5241-5249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klonoski, JM, Hurtig, HR, Juber, BA, Schuneman, MJ, Bickett, TE, Svendsen, JM, Burum, B, Penfound, TA, Sereda, G, Dale, J, Chaussee, MS & Huber, VC 2014, 'Vaccination against the M protein of Streptococcus pyogenes prevents death after influenza virus: S. pyogenes super-infection', Vaccine, vol. 32, no. 40, pp. 5241-5249. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.06.093
Klonoski, Joshua M. ; Hurtig, Heather R. ; Juber, Brian A. ; Schuneman, Margaret J. ; Bickett, Thomas E. ; Svendsen, Joshua M. ; Burum, Brandon ; Penfound, Thomas A. ; Sereda, Grigoriy ; Dale, James ; Chaussee, Michael S. ; Huber, Victor C. / Vaccination against the M protein of Streptococcus pyogenes prevents death after influenza virus : S. pyogenes super-infection. In: Vaccine. 2014 ; Vol. 32, No. 40. pp. 5241-5249.
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