Vaccines against pandemic influenza: What can be done before the next pandemic?

Victor C. Huber, Jonathan Mccullers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We currently do not know which specific influenza subtype or isolate will cause the next influenza pandemic. However, 4 influenza virus hemagglutinin subtypes (H2, H5, H7, and H9) are considered the most likely candidates. Avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype have received the most attention to this point, as their ability to spread within the human population remains the only barrier to emergence of a pandemic strain. Several vaccines have been tested against these potential pandemic viruses using standard methods for developing inactivated vaccines. In general, these vaccines have been poorly immunogenic, requiring high doses and multiple exposures to generate even modest antibody titers. The use of adjuvants to improve presentation of antigen and stimulate the immune system offers promise for enhanced immunity. Currently approved adjuvants, MF59 and Alum, can be readily incorporated into pandemic vaccines, while novel adjuvants are moving toward approval, but may still be years away from routine use. Thus, a prepandemic vaccine strategy that involves the stockpiling of both potential antigens and proven adjuvants may represent the best approach to deal with this looming threat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume27
Issue numberSUPPL. 10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pandemics
Human Influenza
Vaccines
Orthomyxoviridae
Inactivated Vaccines
Influenza in Birds
Antigen Presentation
Hemagglutinins
Immune System
Immunity
Viruses
Antigens
Antibodies
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Vaccines against pandemic influenza : What can be done before the next pandemic? / Huber, Victor C.; Mccullers, Jonathan.

In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, Vol. 27, No. SUPPL. 10, 01.01.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{9ceb59511b684de3a1e3ad2e1362cb3e,
title = "Vaccines against pandemic influenza: What can be done before the next pandemic?",
abstract = "We currently do not know which specific influenza subtype or isolate will cause the next influenza pandemic. However, 4 influenza virus hemagglutinin subtypes (H2, H5, H7, and H9) are considered the most likely candidates. Avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype have received the most attention to this point, as their ability to spread within the human population remains the only barrier to emergence of a pandemic strain. Several vaccines have been tested against these potential pandemic viruses using standard methods for developing inactivated vaccines. In general, these vaccines have been poorly immunogenic, requiring high doses and multiple exposures to generate even modest antibody titers. The use of adjuvants to improve presentation of antigen and stimulate the immune system offers promise for enhanced immunity. Currently approved adjuvants, MF59 and Alum, can be readily incorporated into pandemic vaccines, while novel adjuvants are moving toward approval, but may still be years away from routine use. Thus, a prepandemic vaccine strategy that involves the stockpiling of both potential antigens and proven adjuvants may represent the best approach to deal with this looming threat.",
author = "Huber, {Victor C.} and Jonathan Mccullers",
year = "2008",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/INF.0b013e318168b749",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
journal = "Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal",
issn = "0891-3668",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "SUPPL. 10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vaccines against pandemic influenza

T2 - What can be done before the next pandemic?

AU - Huber, Victor C.

AU - Mccullers, Jonathan

PY - 2008/1/1

Y1 - 2008/1/1

N2 - We currently do not know which specific influenza subtype or isolate will cause the next influenza pandemic. However, 4 influenza virus hemagglutinin subtypes (H2, H5, H7, and H9) are considered the most likely candidates. Avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype have received the most attention to this point, as their ability to spread within the human population remains the only barrier to emergence of a pandemic strain. Several vaccines have been tested against these potential pandemic viruses using standard methods for developing inactivated vaccines. In general, these vaccines have been poorly immunogenic, requiring high doses and multiple exposures to generate even modest antibody titers. The use of adjuvants to improve presentation of antigen and stimulate the immune system offers promise for enhanced immunity. Currently approved adjuvants, MF59 and Alum, can be readily incorporated into pandemic vaccines, while novel adjuvants are moving toward approval, but may still be years away from routine use. Thus, a prepandemic vaccine strategy that involves the stockpiling of both potential antigens and proven adjuvants may represent the best approach to deal with this looming threat.

AB - We currently do not know which specific influenza subtype or isolate will cause the next influenza pandemic. However, 4 influenza virus hemagglutinin subtypes (H2, H5, H7, and H9) are considered the most likely candidates. Avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype have received the most attention to this point, as their ability to spread within the human population remains the only barrier to emergence of a pandemic strain. Several vaccines have been tested against these potential pandemic viruses using standard methods for developing inactivated vaccines. In general, these vaccines have been poorly immunogenic, requiring high doses and multiple exposures to generate even modest antibody titers. The use of adjuvants to improve presentation of antigen and stimulate the immune system offers promise for enhanced immunity. Currently approved adjuvants, MF59 and Alum, can be readily incorporated into pandemic vaccines, while novel adjuvants are moving toward approval, but may still be years away from routine use. Thus, a prepandemic vaccine strategy that involves the stockpiling of both potential antigens and proven adjuvants may represent the best approach to deal with this looming threat.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=56149109467&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=56149109467&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/INF.0b013e318168b749

DO - 10.1097/INF.0b013e318168b749

M3 - Article

C2 - 18820570

AN - SCOPUS:56149109467

VL - 27

JO - Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

JF - Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

SN - 0891-3668

IS - SUPPL. 10

ER -