Vaginal delivery simulation in the Obstetrics and Gynaecology clerkship

Joshua Nitsche, Dana Morris, Kristina Shumard, Ugochi Akoma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Although simulation is now used in other areas of obstetrics and gynaecology, its utility in the training of an uncomplicated vaginal delivery is surprisingly under-explored. Here we describe our experience integrating simulation into the third-year Obstetrics and Gynaecology (OB/GYN) clerkship.

METHODS: In 2013/14, at the start of each 4-week OB/GYN clerkship, each third-year student participated in a 90-minute vaginal delivery simulation session using the Noelle(®) simulator. Upon completion of the clerkship, they were surveyed using a five-point Likert scale questionnaire (1, inferior; 5, superior) to assess self-perceived training adequacy, clinical preparedness and number of deliveries performed during the clerkship. Students who completed the clerkship in 2012/13, before the introduction of the simulation, were also surveyed to serve as a comparison group. Survey scores and number of deliveries performed were compared between the two cohorts of students.

RESULTS: The 2013/14 cohort (n = 98) who received simulation training gave their training in vaginal deliveries an average rating of 4.1, versus 2.7 for the 2012/13 cohort that did not receive the simulation (n = 80; p < 0.001). Self-perceived preparedness to perform a vaginal delivery was 4.0 in the 2013/14 cohort, versus 3.0 in the 2012/13 cohort (p < 0.001). There was no difference in the number of deliveries performed between the cohorts.

DISCUSSION: Students that received simulation rated their training adequacy and readiness to perform a vaginal delivery higher than students that did not receive training. Simulation did not increase participation in real-life deliveries. The utility of simulation in the training of an uncomplicated vaginal delivery is under-explored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-347
Number of pages5
JournalThe clinical teacher
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Gynecology
Obstetrics
Students
Surveys and Questionnaires
Simulation Training

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Review and Exam Preparation

Cite this

Vaginal delivery simulation in the Obstetrics and Gynaecology clerkship. / Nitsche, Joshua; Morris, Dana; Shumard, Kristina; Akoma, Ugochi.

In: The clinical teacher, Vol. 13, No. 5, 01.10.2016, p. 343-347.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nitsche, Joshua ; Morris, Dana ; Shumard, Kristina ; Akoma, Ugochi. / Vaginal delivery simulation in the Obstetrics and Gynaecology clerkship. In: The clinical teacher. 2016 ; Vol. 13, No. 5. pp. 343-347.
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