Vagus nerve stimulation in pediatrics: Determining appropriate candidates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The number of pediatric patients receiving vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy in the United States continues to grow despite the fact that no controlled clinical trials have been conducted regarding VNS in this population. In addition, there are currently no well-defined guidelines for selecting appropriate candidates for VNS therapy. Prospective and retrospective analyses of VNS in pediatric patients with age-related or specialized syndromes indicate that this treatment is safe and effective across a broad range of seizure types and syndromes, independent of age. VNS can reduce seizure frequency and is not associated with the cognitive or developmental impairment that may result from pharmacologic interventions for epilepsy. The efficacy, safety profile, and lack of adverse events usually associated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) suggest that VNS has a role as an adjunctive therapeutic option for patients with refractory epilepsy who have not responded to other therapies (eg, AEDs, ketogenic diet, or surgery) or are not surgical candidates. The fact that no compliance issues are associated with this intervention makes it an attractive option in the pediatric population. In addition, there is the suggestion that implementing this intervention early in the course of epilepsy may increase the therapeutic response rate and reduce the potential for sequelae associated with lonq-term epilepsy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAdvanced Studies in Medicine
Volume5
Issue number5 B
StatePublished - May 1 2005

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Vagus Nerve Stimulation
Pediatrics
Epilepsy
Anticonvulsants
Seizures
Therapeutics
Ketogenic Diet
Controlled Clinical Trials
Population
Compliance
Guidelines
Safety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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Vagus nerve stimulation in pediatrics : Determining appropriate candidates. / Wheless, James.

In: Advanced Studies in Medicine, Vol. 5, No. 5 B, 01.05.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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