Vagus nerve stimulation therapy

James Wheless, James Baumgartner

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Until recently, antiepileptic drugs and traditional epilepsy surgery were the two primary treatment options available to patients with epilepsy. Drug therapy, however, does not always control seizures and can be associated with negative side effects. Additionally, only a minority of patients are candidates for epilepsy surgery. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy, approved by the US FDA in 1997, is now a treatment option that is effective in reducing seizure frequency and severity as well as improving patient quality of life without the pharmacological side effects associated with traditional antiepileptic drugs. Provided here is an overview of VNS therapy and the VNS therapy system, including the history of vagal nerve stimulation, patient selection guidelines and new indications currently under investigation for this novel therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)501-515
Number of pages15
JournalDrugs of Today
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vagus Nerve Stimulation
Epilepsy
Anticonvulsants
Seizures
Therapeutics
Patient Selection
History
Quality of Life
Pharmacology
Guidelines
Drug Therapy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Vagus nerve stimulation therapy. / Wheless, James; Baumgartner, James.

In: Drugs of Today, Vol. 40, No. 6, 01.06.2004, p. 501-515.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Wheless, James ; Baumgartner, James. / Vagus nerve stimulation therapy. In: Drugs of Today. 2004 ; Vol. 40, No. 6. pp. 501-515.
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