Vagus nerve stimulation therapy in pediatric patients with refractory epilepsy: Retrospective study

S. L. Helmers, James Wheless, M. Frost, J. Gates, P. Levisohn, C. Tardo, J. A. Conry, D. Yalnizoglu, J. R. Madsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

161 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This six-center, retrospective study evaluated the effectiveness, tolerability, and safety of vagus nerve stimulation in children. Data were available for 125 patients at baseline, 95 patients at 3 months, 56 patients at 6 months, and 12 patients at 12 months. The typical patient, aged 12 years, had onset of seizures at age 2 years and had tried nine anticonvulsants before implantation. Collected data included preimplant history, seizures, implant, device settings, quality of life, and adverse events. Average seizure reduction was 36.1% at 3 months and 44.7% at 6 months. Common adverse events included voice alteration and coughing during stimulation. Rare adverse events, unique to this age group, included increased drooling and increased hyperactivity. Quality of life improved in alertness, verbal communication, school performance, clustering of seizures, and postictal periods. We concluded that vagus nerve stimulation is an effective treatment for medically refractory epilepsy in children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)843-848
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of child neurology
Volume16
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Fingerprint

Vagus Nerve Stimulation
Epilepsy
Retrospective Studies
Pediatrics
Seizures
Quality of Life
Sialorrhea
Therapeutics
Age of Onset
Anticonvulsants
Cluster Analysis
Age Groups
History
Communication
Safety
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Vagus nerve stimulation therapy in pediatric patients with refractory epilepsy : Retrospective study. / Helmers, S. L.; Wheless, James; Frost, M.; Gates, J.; Levisohn, P.; Tardo, C.; Conry, J. A.; Yalnizoglu, D.; Madsen, J. R.

In: Journal of child neurology, Vol. 16, No. 11, 01.01.2001, p. 843-848.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Helmers, SL, Wheless, J, Frost, M, Gates, J, Levisohn, P, Tardo, C, Conry, JA, Yalnizoglu, D & Madsen, JR 2001, 'Vagus nerve stimulation therapy in pediatric patients with refractory epilepsy: Retrospective study', Journal of child neurology, vol. 16, no. 11, pp. 843-848. https://doi.org/10.1177/08830738010160111101
Helmers, S. L. ; Wheless, James ; Frost, M. ; Gates, J. ; Levisohn, P. ; Tardo, C. ; Conry, J. A. ; Yalnizoglu, D. ; Madsen, J. R. / Vagus nerve stimulation therapy in pediatric patients with refractory epilepsy : Retrospective study. In: Journal of child neurology. 2001 ; Vol. 16, No. 11. pp. 843-848.
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