Validation of a previous-day recall measure of active and sedentary behaviors

Charles E. Matthews, Sarah Kozey Keadle, Joshua Sampson, Kate Lyden, Heather R. Bowles, Stephen C. Moore, Amanda Libertine, Patty S. Freedson, Jay H. Fowke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

PURPOSE: A previous-day recall (PDR) may be a less error-prone alternative to traditional questionnaire-based estimates of physical activity and sedentary behavior (e.g., past year), but the validity of the method is not established. We evaluated the validity of an interviewer administered PDR in adolescents (12-17 yr) and adults (18-71 yr). METHODS: In a 7-d study, participants completed three PDR, wore two activity monitors, and completed measures of social desirability and body mass index. PDR measures of active and sedentary time was contrasted against an accelerometer (ActiGraph) by comparing both to a valid reference measure (activPAL) using measurement error modeling and traditional validation approaches. RESULTS: Age- and sex-specific mixed models comparing PDR to activPAL indicated the following: 1) there was a strong linear relationship between measures for sedentary (regression slope, β1 = 0.80-1.13) and active time (β1 = 0.64-1.09), 2) person-specific bias was lower than random error, and 3) correlations were high (sedentary: r = 0.60-0.81; active: r = 0.52-0.80). Reporting errors were not associated with body mass index or social desirability. Models comparing ActiGraph to activPAL indicated the following: 1) there was a weaker linear relationship between measures for sedentary (β1 = 0.63-0.73) and active time (β1 = 0.61-0.72), (2) person-specific bias was slightly larger than random error, and (3) correlations were high (sedentary: r = 0.68-0.77; active: r = 0.57-0.79). CONCLUSIONS: Correlations between the PDR and the activPAL were high, systematic reporting errors were low, and the validity of the PDR was comparable with the ActiGraph. PDR may have value in studies of physical activity and health, particularly those interested in measuring the specific type, location, and purpose of activity-related behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1629-1638
Number of pages10
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume45
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Social Desirability
Body Mass Index
Interviews
Exercise
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Validation of a previous-day recall measure of active and sedentary behaviors. / Matthews, Charles E.; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Sampson, Joshua; Lyden, Kate; Bowles, Heather R.; Moore, Stephen C.; Libertine, Amanda; Freedson, Patty S.; Fowke, Jay H.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 45, No. 8, 01.08.2013, p. 1629-1638.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matthews, CE, Keadle, SK, Sampson, J, Lyden, K, Bowles, HR, Moore, SC, Libertine, A, Freedson, PS & Fowke, JH 2013, 'Validation of a previous-day recall measure of active and sedentary behaviors', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 45, no. 8, pp. 1629-1638. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e3182897690
Matthews, Charles E. ; Keadle, Sarah Kozey ; Sampson, Joshua ; Lyden, Kate ; Bowles, Heather R. ; Moore, Stephen C. ; Libertine, Amanda ; Freedson, Patty S. ; Fowke, Jay H. / Validation of a previous-day recall measure of active and sedentary behaviors. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2013 ; Vol. 45, No. 8. pp. 1629-1638.
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T1 - Validation of a previous-day recall measure of active and sedentary behaviors

AU - Matthews, Charles E.

AU - Keadle, Sarah Kozey

AU - Sampson, Joshua

AU - Lyden, Kate

AU - Bowles, Heather R.

AU - Moore, Stephen C.

AU - Libertine, Amanda

AU - Freedson, Patty S.

AU - Fowke, Jay H.

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N2 - PURPOSE: A previous-day recall (PDR) may be a less error-prone alternative to traditional questionnaire-based estimates of physical activity and sedentary behavior (e.g., past year), but the validity of the method is not established. We evaluated the validity of an interviewer administered PDR in adolescents (12-17 yr) and adults (18-71 yr). METHODS: In a 7-d study, participants completed three PDR, wore two activity monitors, and completed measures of social desirability and body mass index. PDR measures of active and sedentary time was contrasted against an accelerometer (ActiGraph) by comparing both to a valid reference measure (activPAL) using measurement error modeling and traditional validation approaches. RESULTS: Age- and sex-specific mixed models comparing PDR to activPAL indicated the following: 1) there was a strong linear relationship between measures for sedentary (regression slope, β1 = 0.80-1.13) and active time (β1 = 0.64-1.09), 2) person-specific bias was lower than random error, and 3) correlations were high (sedentary: r = 0.60-0.81; active: r = 0.52-0.80). Reporting errors were not associated with body mass index or social desirability. Models comparing ActiGraph to activPAL indicated the following: 1) there was a weaker linear relationship between measures for sedentary (β1 = 0.63-0.73) and active time (β1 = 0.61-0.72), (2) person-specific bias was slightly larger than random error, and (3) correlations were high (sedentary: r = 0.68-0.77; active: r = 0.57-0.79). CONCLUSIONS: Correlations between the PDR and the activPAL were high, systematic reporting errors were low, and the validity of the PDR was comparable with the ActiGraph. PDR may have value in studies of physical activity and health, particularly those interested in measuring the specific type, location, and purpose of activity-related behaviors.

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