Validity of Clinically Derived Cumulative Somatosensory Impairment Index

Nandini Deshpande, E. Metter, Luigi Ferrucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Deshpande N, Metter EJ, Ferrucci L. Validity of clinically derived Cumulative Somatosensory Impairment Index. Objective: To develop a Cumulative Somatosensory Impairment Index for the lower limbs and evaluate its construct validity for discriminating relevant groups and predictive validity for predicting global postural control over time. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Population-based cohort. Participants: InCHIANTI ("Invecchiare in Chianti" or aging in the Chianti area) study participants (N=960; age, 21-91y, 51.8% women). Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: The Cumulative Somatosensory Impairment Index was derived from baseline performance on clinical tests of pressure sensitivity, vibration sensitivity, proprioception, and graphesthesia. Global postural control was assessed using Frailty and Injuries Cooperative Studies of Intervention Techniques (FICSIT) balance test, time to complete 5 repeated chair stands, and fast walking speed, at baseline and at 3-year follow-up. Results: In participants without neurologic conditions (n=799), the Cumulative Somatosensory Impairment Index was significantly different in age groups classified by decades (P<.001). Compared with participants without prevalent conditions, the Cumulative Somatosensory Impairment Index was significantly higher in persons with diabetes (P=.017), peripheral arterial disease (P=.006), and a history of stroke (P<.001). In the overall population (N=960), in the fully adjusted multiple regression models, the Cumulative Somatosensory Impairment Index independently predicted deterioration in FICSIT scores (P=.002), time for 5 repeated chair stands (P<.001), and fast gait speed (P=.003) at 3-year follow-up. Conclusions: The Cumulative Somatosensory Impairment Index is a valid measure that detects relevant group differences in lower limb somatosensory impairment and is an independent predictor of decline in postural control over 3 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)226-232
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume91
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Lower Extremity
Proprioception
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Wounds and Injuries
Vibration
Nervous System
Population
Cohort Studies
Age Groups
Stroke
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Pressure
Walking Speed

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Validity of Clinically Derived Cumulative Somatosensory Impairment Index. / Deshpande, Nandini; Metter, E.; Ferrucci, Luigi.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 91, No. 2, 01.02.2010, p. 226-232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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