Valuing authority/responsibility relationships: The essence of professional practice

Sherry S. Webb, Sylvia A. Price, Harriet Van Ess Coeling

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Central to the practice of professional nursing are the elements of accountability, autonomy, direct communication, and authority. The value that nursing work groups place on authority affects their level of acceptance of responsibility and accountability for clinical decision making. The authors examined the value that nurse managers and staff nurses on primary nursing and total patient care units place on authority/responsibility relationships. Results indicated that nurse managers and staff nurses on primary nursing units valued accountability, authority, and autonomy more than the nurse managers and staff nurses on total patient care units, a finding consistent with the professional practice model of primary nursing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-33
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nursing Administration
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1996

Fingerprint

Primary Nursing
Nurse Administrators
Professional Practice
Social Responsibility
Nurses
Patient Care
Nursing
Workplace
Communication

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Leadership and Management

Cite this

Valuing authority/responsibility relationships : The essence of professional practice. / Webb, Sherry S.; Price, Sylvia A.; Van Ess Coeling, Harriet.

In: Journal of Nursing Administration, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.02.1996, p. 28-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Webb, Sherry S. ; Price, Sylvia A. ; Van Ess Coeling, Harriet. / Valuing authority/responsibility relationships : The essence of professional practice. In: Journal of Nursing Administration. 1996 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 28-33.
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