Variability in antifungal utilization among neonatal, pediatric, and adult inpatients in academic medical centers throughout the United States of America

Jeremy Stultz, Rose Kohinke, Amy L. Pakyz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Identification of factors associated with antifungal utilization in neonatal, pediatric, and adult patient groups is needed to guide antifungal stewardship initiatives in academic medical centers. Methods: For this hospital-level analysis, we analyzed antifungal use in hospitals across the United States of America, excluding centers only providing care for hematology/oncology patients. Analysis of variance was used to compare antifungal use between patient groups. Three multivariable linear regression models were used to determine independent factors associated with antifungal use in the neonatal, pediatric, and adult patient groups. Results: For the neonatal, pediatric, and adult patient groups, 54, 44, and 60 hospitals were included, respectively. Total antifungal use was significantly lower in the neonatal patient group (14 days of therapy (DOT)/1000 patient days (PDs) versus 76 in pediatrics and 74 in adults, p < 0.05). There were no significant associations identified with total antifungal DOT/1000 PDs in the neonatal patient group (model R2 = 0.11). In the pediatric patient group (model R2 = 0.55), admission to immunosuppressed service lines and total broad-spectrum antibiotic use were positively associated with total antifungal use (coefficients of 1.95 and 0.41, both p < 0.05). In the adult patient group (model R2 = 0.79), admission to immunosuppressed service lines, total invasive fungal infections, and total broad-spectrum antibiotic use were positively associated with total antifungal use (coefficients of 5.08, 5.17, and 0.137, all p < 0.05). Conclusions: Variability in antifungal use in the neonatal group could not be explained well, whereas factors were associated with antifungal use in the adult and pediatric patient groups. These data can help guide antifungal stewardship initiatives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number501
JournalBMC Infectious Diseases
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2018

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Inpatients
Pediatrics
Linear Models
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Hematology
Analysis of Variance
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "Variability in antifungal utilization among neonatal, pediatric, and adult inpatients in academic medical centers throughout the United States of America",
abstract = "Background: Identification of factors associated with antifungal utilization in neonatal, pediatric, and adult patient groups is needed to guide antifungal stewardship initiatives in academic medical centers. Methods: For this hospital-level analysis, we analyzed antifungal use in hospitals across the United States of America, excluding centers only providing care for hematology/oncology patients. Analysis of variance was used to compare antifungal use between patient groups. Three multivariable linear regression models were used to determine independent factors associated with antifungal use in the neonatal, pediatric, and adult patient groups. Results: For the neonatal, pediatric, and adult patient groups, 54, 44, and 60 hospitals were included, respectively. Total antifungal use was significantly lower in the neonatal patient group (14 days of therapy (DOT)/1000 patient days (PDs) versus 76 in pediatrics and 74 in adults, p < 0.05). There were no significant associations identified with total antifungal DOT/1000 PDs in the neonatal patient group (model R2 = 0.11). In the pediatric patient group (model R2 = 0.55), admission to immunosuppressed service lines and total broad-spectrum antibiotic use were positively associated with total antifungal use (coefficients of 1.95 and 0.41, both p < 0.05). In the adult patient group (model R2 = 0.79), admission to immunosuppressed service lines, total invasive fungal infections, and total broad-spectrum antibiotic use were positively associated with total antifungal use (coefficients of 5.08, 5.17, and 0.137, all p < 0.05). Conclusions: Variability in antifungal use in the neonatal group could not be explained well, whereas factors were associated with antifungal use in the adult and pediatric patient groups. These data can help guide antifungal stewardship initiatives.",
author = "Jeremy Stultz and Rose Kohinke and Pakyz, {Amy L.}",
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AU - Kohinke, Rose

AU - Pakyz, Amy L.

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Y1 - 2018/10/3

N2 - Background: Identification of factors associated with antifungal utilization in neonatal, pediatric, and adult patient groups is needed to guide antifungal stewardship initiatives in academic medical centers. Methods: For this hospital-level analysis, we analyzed antifungal use in hospitals across the United States of America, excluding centers only providing care for hematology/oncology patients. Analysis of variance was used to compare antifungal use between patient groups. Three multivariable linear regression models were used to determine independent factors associated with antifungal use in the neonatal, pediatric, and adult patient groups. Results: For the neonatal, pediatric, and adult patient groups, 54, 44, and 60 hospitals were included, respectively. Total antifungal use was significantly lower in the neonatal patient group (14 days of therapy (DOT)/1000 patient days (PDs) versus 76 in pediatrics and 74 in adults, p < 0.05). There were no significant associations identified with total antifungal DOT/1000 PDs in the neonatal patient group (model R2 = 0.11). In the pediatric patient group (model R2 = 0.55), admission to immunosuppressed service lines and total broad-spectrum antibiotic use were positively associated with total antifungal use (coefficients of 1.95 and 0.41, both p < 0.05). In the adult patient group (model R2 = 0.79), admission to immunosuppressed service lines, total invasive fungal infections, and total broad-spectrum antibiotic use were positively associated with total antifungal use (coefficients of 5.08, 5.17, and 0.137, all p < 0.05). Conclusions: Variability in antifungal use in the neonatal group could not be explained well, whereas factors were associated with antifungal use in the adult and pediatric patient groups. These data can help guide antifungal stewardship initiatives.

AB - Background: Identification of factors associated with antifungal utilization in neonatal, pediatric, and adult patient groups is needed to guide antifungal stewardship initiatives in academic medical centers. Methods: For this hospital-level analysis, we analyzed antifungal use in hospitals across the United States of America, excluding centers only providing care for hematology/oncology patients. Analysis of variance was used to compare antifungal use between patient groups. Three multivariable linear regression models were used to determine independent factors associated with antifungal use in the neonatal, pediatric, and adult patient groups. Results: For the neonatal, pediatric, and adult patient groups, 54, 44, and 60 hospitals were included, respectively. Total antifungal use was significantly lower in the neonatal patient group (14 days of therapy (DOT)/1000 patient days (PDs) versus 76 in pediatrics and 74 in adults, p < 0.05). There were no significant associations identified with total antifungal DOT/1000 PDs in the neonatal patient group (model R2 = 0.11). In the pediatric patient group (model R2 = 0.55), admission to immunosuppressed service lines and total broad-spectrum antibiotic use were positively associated with total antifungal use (coefficients of 1.95 and 0.41, both p < 0.05). In the adult patient group (model R2 = 0.79), admission to immunosuppressed service lines, total invasive fungal infections, and total broad-spectrum antibiotic use were positively associated with total antifungal use (coefficients of 5.08, 5.17, and 0.137, all p < 0.05). Conclusions: Variability in antifungal use in the neonatal group could not be explained well, whereas factors were associated with antifungal use in the adult and pediatric patient groups. These data can help guide antifungal stewardship initiatives.

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