Variations in dietary iron alter behavior in developing rats

Domingo J. Piñero, Byron Jones, John L. Beard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Iron deficiency in children is associated with retardation in growth and cognitive development, and the effects on cognition may be irreversible, even with treatment. Excessive iron has also been associated with neurological disease, especially in reference to the increased iron content in the brains of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease patients. This study evaluated the effects of dietary iron deficiency and excess iron on physical activity in rats. The animal model used is developmentally sensitive and permits control of the timing as well as the duration of the nutritional insult. Hence, to study the effects of early, late and long-term iron deficiency or excess iron (supplementation), rats were either made iron deficient or supplemented on postnatal day (PND) 10-21, PND 21-35 and PND 10-35. Some iron-deficient rats were iron repleted between PND 21-35. Different measures of motor activity were taken at PND 14, 17, 20, 27 and 34. Iron-deficient and iron-supplemented rats showed decreased activity and stereotypic behavior; this was apparent for any onset and duration of the nutritional insult. Recovery from iron deficiency did not normalize these functional variables, showing that the deleterious effects of early iron deficiency persist despite subsequent adequate treatment. This study demonstrates that iron deficiency in early life leads to irreversible behavioral changes. The biological bases for these behavioral alterations are not readily apparent, because iron therapy rapidly reverses the iron losses in all brain regions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-318
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume131
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 14 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dietary Iron
Iron

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Variations in dietary iron alter behavior in developing rats. / Piñero, Domingo J.; Jones, Byron; Beard, John L.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 131, No. 2, 14.02.2001, p. 311-318.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Piñero, DJ, Jones, B & Beard, JL 2001, 'Variations in dietary iron alter behavior in developing rats', Journal of Nutrition, vol. 131, no. 2, pp. 311-318.
Piñero, Domingo J. ; Jones, Byron ; Beard, John L. / Variations in dietary iron alter behavior in developing rats. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2001 ; Vol. 131, No. 2. pp. 311-318.
@article{e527dc7032104a5087f8b29b18a017a8,
title = "Variations in dietary iron alter behavior in developing rats",
abstract = "Iron deficiency in children is associated with retardation in growth and cognitive development, and the effects on cognition may be irreversible, even with treatment. Excessive iron has also been associated with neurological disease, especially in reference to the increased iron content in the brains of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease patients. This study evaluated the effects of dietary iron deficiency and excess iron on physical activity in rats. The animal model used is developmentally sensitive and permits control of the timing as well as the duration of the nutritional insult. Hence, to study the effects of early, late and long-term iron deficiency or excess iron (supplementation), rats were either made iron deficient or supplemented on postnatal day (PND) 10-21, PND 21-35 and PND 10-35. Some iron-deficient rats were iron repleted between PND 21-35. Different measures of motor activity were taken at PND 14, 17, 20, 27 and 34. Iron-deficient and iron-supplemented rats showed decreased activity and stereotypic behavior; this was apparent for any onset and duration of the nutritional insult. Recovery from iron deficiency did not normalize these functional variables, showing that the deleterious effects of early iron deficiency persist despite subsequent adequate treatment. This study demonstrates that iron deficiency in early life leads to irreversible behavioral changes. The biological bases for these behavioral alterations are not readily apparent, because iron therapy rapidly reverses the iron losses in all brain regions.",
author = "Pi{\~n}ero, {Domingo J.} and Byron Jones and Beard, {John L.}",
year = "2001",
month = "2",
day = "14",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "131",
pages = "311--318",
journal = "Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "0022-3166",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Variations in dietary iron alter behavior in developing rats

AU - Piñero, Domingo J.

AU - Jones, Byron

AU - Beard, John L.

PY - 2001/2/14

Y1 - 2001/2/14

N2 - Iron deficiency in children is associated with retardation in growth and cognitive development, and the effects on cognition may be irreversible, even with treatment. Excessive iron has also been associated with neurological disease, especially in reference to the increased iron content in the brains of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease patients. This study evaluated the effects of dietary iron deficiency and excess iron on physical activity in rats. The animal model used is developmentally sensitive and permits control of the timing as well as the duration of the nutritional insult. Hence, to study the effects of early, late and long-term iron deficiency or excess iron (supplementation), rats were either made iron deficient or supplemented on postnatal day (PND) 10-21, PND 21-35 and PND 10-35. Some iron-deficient rats were iron repleted between PND 21-35. Different measures of motor activity were taken at PND 14, 17, 20, 27 and 34. Iron-deficient and iron-supplemented rats showed decreased activity and stereotypic behavior; this was apparent for any onset and duration of the nutritional insult. Recovery from iron deficiency did not normalize these functional variables, showing that the deleterious effects of early iron deficiency persist despite subsequent adequate treatment. This study demonstrates that iron deficiency in early life leads to irreversible behavioral changes. The biological bases for these behavioral alterations are not readily apparent, because iron therapy rapidly reverses the iron losses in all brain regions.

AB - Iron deficiency in children is associated with retardation in growth and cognitive development, and the effects on cognition may be irreversible, even with treatment. Excessive iron has also been associated with neurological disease, especially in reference to the increased iron content in the brains of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease patients. This study evaluated the effects of dietary iron deficiency and excess iron on physical activity in rats. The animal model used is developmentally sensitive and permits control of the timing as well as the duration of the nutritional insult. Hence, to study the effects of early, late and long-term iron deficiency or excess iron (supplementation), rats were either made iron deficient or supplemented on postnatal day (PND) 10-21, PND 21-35 and PND 10-35. Some iron-deficient rats were iron repleted between PND 21-35. Different measures of motor activity were taken at PND 14, 17, 20, 27 and 34. Iron-deficient and iron-supplemented rats showed decreased activity and stereotypic behavior; this was apparent for any onset and duration of the nutritional insult. Recovery from iron deficiency did not normalize these functional variables, showing that the deleterious effects of early iron deficiency persist despite subsequent adequate treatment. This study demonstrates that iron deficiency in early life leads to irreversible behavioral changes. The biological bases for these behavioral alterations are not readily apparent, because iron therapy rapidly reverses the iron losses in all brain regions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035155874&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035155874&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 131

SP - 311

EP - 318

JO - Journal of Nutrition

JF - Journal of Nutrition

SN - 0022-3166

IS - 2

ER -