Vasopressin and prostanoid mechanisms in control of cerebral blood flow in hypotensive newborn pigs

W. M. Armstead, Charles Leffler, D. W. Busija, R. Mirro

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Abstract

The interaction between vasopressinergic and prostanoid mechanisms in the control of cerebral hemodynamics in the conscious hypotensive newborn pig was investigated. Indomethacin treatment (5 mg/kg) of hypotensive piglets caused a significant decrease in blood flow to all brain regions within 20 min. This decrease in cerebral blood flow resulted from increased cerebral vascular resistances of 52 and 198% 20 and 40 min after treatment, respectively. Cerebral oxygen consumption was reduced from 2.58 ± 0.32 ml·100g-1·min-1 to 1.01 ± 0.12 and 0.29 ± 0.08 ml·g-1·min-1 20 and 40 min after indomethacin, respectively, in hemorrhaged piglets. Treatment with the putative vascular (V1) receptor antagonist [1-(β-mercapto-β,β-cyclopentamethylene propionic acid-2-(O-methyl)tyrosine]arginine vasopressin (MEAVP) had no effect on regional cerebral blood flow, calculated cerebral vascular resistance, or cerebral metabolic rate either before or during hemorrhagic hypotension. However, decreases in cerebral blood flow and metabolic rate and increases in vascular resistance on treatment with indomethacin were blunted markedly in animals treated with MEAVP. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the prostanoid system contributes to the maintenance of cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate during hypotension in the newborn pig, as reported previously, and implicate removal of vasopressinergic modulation by prostanoids as a potential mechanism for indomethacin-induced cerebral vasoconstriction in hypotensive newborn piglets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume258
Issue number2 27-2
StatePublished - 1990

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Cerebrovascular Circulation
Vasopressins
Indomethacin
Prostaglandins
Swine
Vascular Resistance
Arginine Vasopressin
Hypotension
Tyrosine
Vasopressin Receptors
Regional Blood Flow
Vasoconstriction
Oxygen Consumption
Blood Vessels
Hemodynamics
Maintenance
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology

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Vasopressin and prostanoid mechanisms in control of cerebral blood flow in hypotensive newborn pigs. / Armstead, W. M.; Leffler, Charles; Busija, D. W.; Mirro, R.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 258, No. 2 27-2, 1990.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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