Ventricular catheter development: Past, present, and future

Sofy H. Weisenberg, Stephanie C. Termaath, Chad E. Seaver, James Killeffer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cerebrospinal fluid diversion via ventricular shunting is the prevailing contemporary treatment for hydrocephalus. The CSF shunt appeared in its current form in the 1950s, and modern CSF shunts are the result of 6 decades of significant progress in neurosurgery and biomedical engineering. However, despite revolutionary advances in material science, computational design optimization, manufacturing, and sensors, the ventricular catheter (VC) component of CSF shunts today remains largely unchanged in its functionality and capabilities from its original design, even though VC obstruction remains a primary cause of shunt failure. The objective of this paper is to investigate the history of VCs, including successful and failed alterations in mechanical design and material composition, to better understand the challenges that hinder development of a more effective design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1504-1512
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of neurosurgery
Volume125
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Fingerprint

Catheter Obstruction
Biomedical Engineering
Neurosurgery
Hydrocephalus
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Catheters
History

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Ventricular catheter development : Past, present, and future. / Weisenberg, Sofy H.; Termaath, Stephanie C.; Seaver, Chad E.; Killeffer, James.

In: Journal of neurosurgery, Vol. 125, No. 6, 01.12.2016, p. 1504-1512.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Weisenberg, Sofy H. ; Termaath, Stephanie C. ; Seaver, Chad E. ; Killeffer, James. / Ventricular catheter development : Past, present, and future. In: Journal of neurosurgery. 2016 ; Vol. 125, No. 6. pp. 1504-1512.
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