Ventricular wall thickness and volume during hemodynamic collapse produced by AC leakage current

B. K. Hoffmeister, B. S. Sheals, Amy Curry, R. A. Malkin

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Medical equipment can unintentionally allow the flow of power line current through the patient causing complete hemodynamic collapse without fibrillation. This study tests the hypothesis that static wall thickening accompanies AC induced collapse via an isovolumic state. In 3 dogs, we delivered AC current stimulation ranging from 10-160 Hz and 10-1000 μA to the right ventricle. A steerable, quadripolar catheter was placed in the apex of the left ventricle and deflected towards the basal region to measure left ventricular volume. Two dimensional, short-axis ultrasound images of the LV endocardial walls were recorded to measure wall thickness. Our results indicate that wall thickness during collapse is significantly greater than during systole (Δ thickness = 11.7±12 mm, p<0.001) and diastole (Δ thickness = 23.6±13 mm, p<0.001). In addition, the volume of the left ventricle is significantly smaller during collapse than the average volume during normal sinus rhythm (Δ impedance = 0.152±0.006 no units, p<0.001).

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Biomedical equipment
Catheters
Hemodynamics
Leakage currents
Heart Ventricles
Ultrasonics
Diastole
Systole
Electric Impedance
Dogs
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Ventricular wall thickness and volume during hemodynamic collapse produced by AC leakage current. / Hoffmeister, B. K.; Sheals, B. S.; Curry, Amy; Malkin, R. A.

In: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings, Vol. 2, 01.12.2002.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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abstract = "Medical equipment can unintentionally allow the flow of power line current through the patient causing complete hemodynamic collapse without fibrillation. This study tests the hypothesis that static wall thickening accompanies AC induced collapse via an isovolumic state. In 3 dogs, we delivered AC current stimulation ranging from 10-160 Hz and 10-1000 μA to the right ventricle. A steerable, quadripolar catheter was placed in the apex of the left ventricle and deflected towards the basal region to measure left ventricular volume. Two dimensional, short-axis ultrasound images of the LV endocardial walls were recorded to measure wall thickness. Our results indicate that wall thickness during collapse is significantly greater than during systole (Δ thickness = 11.7±12 mm, p<0.001) and diastole (Δ thickness = 23.6±13 mm, p<0.001). In addition, the volume of the left ventricle is significantly smaller during collapse than the average volume during normal sinus rhythm (Δ impedance = 0.152±0.006 no units, p<0.001).",
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AU - Hoffmeister, B. K.

AU - Sheals, B. S.

AU - Curry, Amy

AU - Malkin, R. A.

PY - 2002/12/1

Y1 - 2002/12/1

N2 - Medical equipment can unintentionally allow the flow of power line current through the patient causing complete hemodynamic collapse without fibrillation. This study tests the hypothesis that static wall thickening accompanies AC induced collapse via an isovolumic state. In 3 dogs, we delivered AC current stimulation ranging from 10-160 Hz and 10-1000 μA to the right ventricle. A steerable, quadripolar catheter was placed in the apex of the left ventricle and deflected towards the basal region to measure left ventricular volume. Two dimensional, short-axis ultrasound images of the LV endocardial walls were recorded to measure wall thickness. Our results indicate that wall thickness during collapse is significantly greater than during systole (Δ thickness = 11.7±12 mm, p<0.001) and diastole (Δ thickness = 23.6±13 mm, p<0.001). In addition, the volume of the left ventricle is significantly smaller during collapse than the average volume during normal sinus rhythm (Δ impedance = 0.152±0.006 no units, p<0.001).

AB - Medical equipment can unintentionally allow the flow of power line current through the patient causing complete hemodynamic collapse without fibrillation. This study tests the hypothesis that static wall thickening accompanies AC induced collapse via an isovolumic state. In 3 dogs, we delivered AC current stimulation ranging from 10-160 Hz and 10-1000 μA to the right ventricle. A steerable, quadripolar catheter was placed in the apex of the left ventricle and deflected towards the basal region to measure left ventricular volume. Two dimensional, short-axis ultrasound images of the LV endocardial walls were recorded to measure wall thickness. Our results indicate that wall thickness during collapse is significantly greater than during systole (Δ thickness = 11.7±12 mm, p<0.001) and diastole (Δ thickness = 23.6±13 mm, p<0.001). In addition, the volume of the left ventricle is significantly smaller during collapse than the average volume during normal sinus rhythm (Δ impedance = 0.152±0.006 no units, p<0.001).

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