Ventriculosubgaleal shunt

a treatment option for progressive posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus

Salim Rahman, Charles Teo, William Morris, Dixon Lao, Frederick Boop

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Among premature infants born at less than 1500 g, the incidence of intraventricular hemorrhage is greater than 45%. Of these, 40% will develop progressive posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PPHH). Optimum treatment remains controversial. Ventriculosubgaleal (VSG) shunts were first proposed as a means of temporarily diverting cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a more physiological manner for those infants less than 1500 g in weight who would not tolerate a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt. The VSG shunt could then be converted into a VP shunt when the infant had gained the desired weight. Despite favorable reports, the procedure has not gained universal acceptance and is unknown to many neurosurgeons. The present authors report a series of 15 patients who had VSG shunts inserted with excellent temporary CSF diversion and no complications. Furthermore, 3 out of the 15 patients required no further treatment. We suggest that VSG shunting is a safe and effective means of treating the premature infant with PPHH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)650-654
Number of pages5
JournalChild's Nervous System
Volume11
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt
Hydrocephalus
Premature Infants
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Weights and Measures
Hemorrhage
Incidence
Therapeutics
Neurosurgeons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Ventriculosubgaleal shunt : a treatment option for progressive posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus. / Rahman, Salim; Teo, Charles; Morris, William; Lao, Dixon; Boop, Frederick.

In: Child's Nervous System, Vol. 11, No. 11, 01.11.1995, p. 650-654.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rahman, Salim ; Teo, Charles ; Morris, William ; Lao, Dixon ; Boop, Frederick. / Ventriculosubgaleal shunt : a treatment option for progressive posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus. In: Child's Nervous System. 1995 ; Vol. 11, No. 11. pp. 650-654.
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