Verbal and Figural Fluency in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Does Hippocampal Sclerosis Affect Performance?

Ioannis Zalonis, Foteini Christidi, Artemios Artemiadis, Constantinos Psarros, George Papadopoulos, Georgios Tsivgoulis, Stergios Gatzonis, Anna Siatouni, Georgios Velonakis, Efstratios Karavasilis, Evangelia Kararizou, Nikolaos Triantafyllou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Clinicians commonly use verbal and nonverbal measures to test fluency in patients with epilepsy, either during routine cognitive assessment or as part of pre- A nd postsurgical evaluation. We hypothesized that patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis would perform worse than patients with lateral TLE in both verbal and design fluency. Methods: We assessed semantic, phonemic, and nonverbal fluency in 49 patients with TLE: 31 with lateral TLE and 18 with mesial TLE plus hippocampal sclerosis. We also gave non-fluency cognitive measures: Psychomotor speed, attentional set shifting, selective attention, abstract reasoning, verbal and visual episodic memory, and incidental memory. Results: Patients with mesial TLE performed significantly worse on figural fluency than patients with lateral TLE. Even though group differences on verbal fluency measures were not significant, the patients with mesial TLE had a pattern of poorer performance. The patients with mesial TLE scored significantly worse on measures of selective attention, verbal episodic memory, and incidental memory. Conclusions: Our study underlines differences in cognitive function between patients with mesial and lateral TLE, particularly in figural fluency. Although we cannot directly assess the role of the hippocampus in cognitive aspects of creative and divergent thinking related to figural fluency, the cognitive discrepancies between these two TLE groups could be ascribed to the mesial TLE hippocampal pathology shown in our study and addressed in the literature on hippocampal involvement in divergent thinking. Our findings could benefit cognitive rehabilitation programs tailored to the needs of patients with TLE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-56
Number of pages9
JournalCognitive and Behavioral Neurology
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Temporal Lobe Epilepsy
Sclerosis
Episodic Memory
Creativity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Verbal and Figural Fluency in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy : Does Hippocampal Sclerosis Affect Performance? / Zalonis, Ioannis; Christidi, Foteini; Artemiadis, Artemios; Psarros, Constantinos; Papadopoulos, George; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Gatzonis, Stergios; Siatouni, Anna; Velonakis, Georgios; Karavasilis, Efstratios; Kararizou, Evangelia; Triantafyllou, Nikolaos.

In: Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology, Vol. 30, No. 2, 01.01.2017, p. 48-56.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zalonis, I, Christidi, F, Artemiadis, A, Psarros, C, Papadopoulos, G, Tsivgoulis, G, Gatzonis, S, Siatouni, A, Velonakis, G, Karavasilis, E, Kararizou, E & Triantafyllou, N 2017, 'Verbal and Figural Fluency in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Does Hippocampal Sclerosis Affect Performance?', Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 48-56. https://doi.org/10.1097/WNN.0000000000000123
Zalonis, Ioannis ; Christidi, Foteini ; Artemiadis, Artemios ; Psarros, Constantinos ; Papadopoulos, George ; Tsivgoulis, Georgios ; Gatzonis, Stergios ; Siatouni, Anna ; Velonakis, Georgios ; Karavasilis, Efstratios ; Kararizou, Evangelia ; Triantafyllou, Nikolaos. / Verbal and Figural Fluency in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy : Does Hippocampal Sclerosis Affect Performance?. In: Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology. 2017 ; Vol. 30, No. 2. pp. 48-56.
@article{260782bb439841e09131e7983f778551,
title = "Verbal and Figural Fluency in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Does Hippocampal Sclerosis Affect Performance?",
abstract = "Background and Objectives: Clinicians commonly use verbal and nonverbal measures to test fluency in patients with epilepsy, either during routine cognitive assessment or as part of pre- A nd postsurgical evaluation. We hypothesized that patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis would perform worse than patients with lateral TLE in both verbal and design fluency. Methods: We assessed semantic, phonemic, and nonverbal fluency in 49 patients with TLE: 31 with lateral TLE and 18 with mesial TLE plus hippocampal sclerosis. We also gave non-fluency cognitive measures: Psychomotor speed, attentional set shifting, selective attention, abstract reasoning, verbal and visual episodic memory, and incidental memory. Results: Patients with mesial TLE performed significantly worse on figural fluency than patients with lateral TLE. Even though group differences on verbal fluency measures were not significant, the patients with mesial TLE had a pattern of poorer performance. The patients with mesial TLE scored significantly worse on measures of selective attention, verbal episodic memory, and incidental memory. Conclusions: Our study underlines differences in cognitive function between patients with mesial and lateral TLE, particularly in figural fluency. Although we cannot directly assess the role of the hippocampus in cognitive aspects of creative and divergent thinking related to figural fluency, the cognitive discrepancies between these two TLE groups could be ascribed to the mesial TLE hippocampal pathology shown in our study and addressed in the literature on hippocampal involvement in divergent thinking. Our findings could benefit cognitive rehabilitation programs tailored to the needs of patients with TLE.",
author = "Ioannis Zalonis and Foteini Christidi and Artemios Artemiadis and Constantinos Psarros and George Papadopoulos and Georgios Tsivgoulis and Stergios Gatzonis and Anna Siatouni and Georgios Velonakis and Efstratios Karavasilis and Evangelia Kararizou and Nikolaos Triantafyllou",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/WNN.0000000000000123",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "48--56",
journal = "Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology",
issn = "1543-3633",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Verbal and Figural Fluency in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

T2 - Does Hippocampal Sclerosis Affect Performance?

AU - Zalonis, Ioannis

AU - Christidi, Foteini

AU - Artemiadis, Artemios

AU - Psarros, Constantinos

AU - Papadopoulos, George

AU - Tsivgoulis, Georgios

AU - Gatzonis, Stergios

AU - Siatouni, Anna

AU - Velonakis, Georgios

AU - Karavasilis, Efstratios

AU - Kararizou, Evangelia

AU - Triantafyllou, Nikolaos

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Background and Objectives: Clinicians commonly use verbal and nonverbal measures to test fluency in patients with epilepsy, either during routine cognitive assessment or as part of pre- A nd postsurgical evaluation. We hypothesized that patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis would perform worse than patients with lateral TLE in both verbal and design fluency. Methods: We assessed semantic, phonemic, and nonverbal fluency in 49 patients with TLE: 31 with lateral TLE and 18 with mesial TLE plus hippocampal sclerosis. We also gave non-fluency cognitive measures: Psychomotor speed, attentional set shifting, selective attention, abstract reasoning, verbal and visual episodic memory, and incidental memory. Results: Patients with mesial TLE performed significantly worse on figural fluency than patients with lateral TLE. Even though group differences on verbal fluency measures were not significant, the patients with mesial TLE had a pattern of poorer performance. The patients with mesial TLE scored significantly worse on measures of selective attention, verbal episodic memory, and incidental memory. Conclusions: Our study underlines differences in cognitive function between patients with mesial and lateral TLE, particularly in figural fluency. Although we cannot directly assess the role of the hippocampus in cognitive aspects of creative and divergent thinking related to figural fluency, the cognitive discrepancies between these two TLE groups could be ascribed to the mesial TLE hippocampal pathology shown in our study and addressed in the literature on hippocampal involvement in divergent thinking. Our findings could benefit cognitive rehabilitation programs tailored to the needs of patients with TLE.

AB - Background and Objectives: Clinicians commonly use verbal and nonverbal measures to test fluency in patients with epilepsy, either during routine cognitive assessment or as part of pre- A nd postsurgical evaluation. We hypothesized that patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis would perform worse than patients with lateral TLE in both verbal and design fluency. Methods: We assessed semantic, phonemic, and nonverbal fluency in 49 patients with TLE: 31 with lateral TLE and 18 with mesial TLE plus hippocampal sclerosis. We also gave non-fluency cognitive measures: Psychomotor speed, attentional set shifting, selective attention, abstract reasoning, verbal and visual episodic memory, and incidental memory. Results: Patients with mesial TLE performed significantly worse on figural fluency than patients with lateral TLE. Even though group differences on verbal fluency measures were not significant, the patients with mesial TLE had a pattern of poorer performance. The patients with mesial TLE scored significantly worse on measures of selective attention, verbal episodic memory, and incidental memory. Conclusions: Our study underlines differences in cognitive function between patients with mesial and lateral TLE, particularly in figural fluency. Although we cannot directly assess the role of the hippocampus in cognitive aspects of creative and divergent thinking related to figural fluency, the cognitive discrepancies between these two TLE groups could be ascribed to the mesial TLE hippocampal pathology shown in our study and addressed in the literature on hippocampal involvement in divergent thinking. Our findings could benefit cognitive rehabilitation programs tailored to the needs of patients with TLE.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85022077552&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85022077552&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/WNN.0000000000000123

DO - 10.1097/WNN.0000000000000123

M3 - Article

C2 - 28632521

AN - SCOPUS:85022077552

VL - 30

SP - 48

EP - 56

JO - Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology

JF - Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology

SN - 1543-3633

IS - 2

ER -