Viral endomyocardial infection in the 1st year post transplant is associated with persistent inflammation in children who have undergone cardiac transplant

Kimberly Molina, Susan Denfield, Yuxin Fan, Mousumi Moulik, Jeffrey Towbin, William Dreyer, Joseph Rossano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Viral genome in cardiac allograft has been associated with early graft loss in children who have undergone cardiac transplant from unknown mechanisms. Methods: This study is a retrospective review of children who have undergone cardiac transplant at a single institution from 1/2004 to 5/2008. Patients underwent cardiac catheterisations with endomyocardial biopsies to evaluate for rejection - graded on Texas Heart Institute scale - and the presence of virus by polymerase chain reaction. Patients with virus identified during the first year post transplant were compared at 1 year post transplant with virus-free patients. Results: The cohort comprised 59 patients, and the median age at transplant was 5.1 years. Viral genomes were isolated from 18 (31%) patients. The PCR + group had increased inflammation on endomyocardial biopsies, with a median score of 4 (ISHLT IR) versus 1 (ISHLT 1R) in the PCR - group (p = 0.014). The PCR + group had a similar cardiac index (median 3.7 ml/min/m2), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (median 10 mmHg), and pulmonary vascular resistance index (median 1.7 U m2) comparatively. PCR + patients were more likely to have experienced an episode of rejection (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Children who developed viral endomyocardial infections after a cardiac transplant have increased allograft inflammation compared with virus-free patients. However, the haemodynamic profile is similar between the groups. The ongoing subclinical inflammation may contribute to the early graft loss associated with these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-336
Number of pages6
JournalCardiology in the Young
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Virus Diseases
Inflammation
Transplants
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Viruses
Viral Genome
Allografts
Biopsy
Pulmonary Wedge Pressure
Cardiac Catheterization
Vascular Resistance
Hemodynamics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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Viral endomyocardial infection in the 1st year post transplant is associated with persistent inflammation in children who have undergone cardiac transplant. / Molina, Kimberly; Denfield, Susan; Fan, Yuxin; Moulik, Mousumi; Towbin, Jeffrey; Dreyer, William; Rossano, Joseph.

In: Cardiology in the Young, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.01.2008, p. 331-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Molina, Kimberly ; Denfield, Susan ; Fan, Yuxin ; Moulik, Mousumi ; Towbin, Jeffrey ; Dreyer, William ; Rossano, Joseph. / Viral endomyocardial infection in the 1st year post transplant is associated with persistent inflammation in children who have undergone cardiac transplant. In: Cardiology in the Young. 2008 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 331-336.
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