Virtual pediatric patient activities with randomized scenarios as an instructional tool for pharmacy students

Jeremy Stultz, Michael Forder, Amy L. Pakyz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES To assess student pharmacist best activity scores and related exam question performance based on the number of pediatric virtual patient activity (VPA) attempts. METHODS A 40-point asthma VPA was implemented and included three possible randomized scenarios. A 60-point meningitis VPA was implemented and included three possible randomized scenarios followed by an additional three possible randomized scenarios only if the first scenario was correctly completed. Points were awarded in the VPA based on appropriateness of treatment decisions. Students were allowed unlimited VPA attempts individually and as a group in class. Three exam questions were based on a fourth scenario of each randomized portion of the VPAs. The Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney U test, and T-test were used for statistical comparisons when appropriate. RESULTS Of 132 students, median individual best asthma VPA scores were 15.25, 22, and 30 for those with 1, 2, and ≥3 asthma attempts, respectively (p < 0.001). Median individual best meningitis VPA scores were 4, 5, 7, and 45.5 for those with 1, 2, 3 to 4, and ≥5 attempts, respectively (p < 0.001). Median number of group VPA attempts was higher among students who correctly answered the exam question related to the first randomized meningitis scenario (10 versus 4, p = 0.015), although no differences in attempts were found for the other related questions (all p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Students who completed the VPAs more times achieved greater individual best scores. Students who correctly answered related exam questions had a higher number of group VPA attempts only when continuation of the VPA required correct randomized scenario completion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)444-452
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pediatric Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

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Pharmacy Students
Pediatrics
Students
Asthma
Nonparametric Statistics
Meningitis
Pharmacists

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Virtual pediatric patient activities with randomized scenarios as an instructional tool for pharmacy students. / Stultz, Jeremy; Forder, Michael; Pakyz, Amy L.

In: Journal of Pediatric Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 22, No. 6, 01.11.2017, p. 444-452.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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