Visual evoked magnetic fields reveal activity in the superior temporal sulcus

Robert L. Rogers, Luis F H Basile, Andrew Papanicolaou, Thomas W. Bourbon, Howard M. Eisenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evoked magnetic fields to randomized infrequent omissions of visual stimuli resulted in a magnetic field pattern over the right hemisphere consistent with a dipolar source and led to localization of this source within the superior temporal sulcus. Previous investigations using implanted microelectrodes, ablation/lesion procedures in monkeys and observations of behavioral anomalies following injury in humans have already indicated the importance of the inferior portions of the temporal lobe in visual processing. However, until now, no method was available to study noninvasively the role of temporal cortex during visual processing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)344-347
Number of pages4
JournalElectroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology
Volume86
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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Temporal Lobe
Magnetic Fields
Microelectrodes
Haplorhini
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Visual evoked magnetic fields reveal activity in the superior temporal sulcus. / Rogers, Robert L.; Basile, Luis F H; Papanicolaou, Andrew; Bourbon, Thomas W.; Eisenberg, Howard M.

In: Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 86, No. 5, 01.01.1993, p. 344-347.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rogers, Robert L. ; Basile, Luis F H ; Papanicolaou, Andrew ; Bourbon, Thomas W. ; Eisenberg, Howard M. / Visual evoked magnetic fields reveal activity in the superior temporal sulcus. In: Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology. 1993 ; Vol. 86, No. 5. pp. 344-347.
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