Vitamin C deficiency increases basal exploratory activity but decreases scopolamine-induced activity in APP/PSEN1 transgenic mice

F. E. Harrison, J. M. May, Michael Mcdonald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant and its levels are decreased in Alzheimer's patients. Even sub-clinical vitamin C deficiency could impact disease development. To investigate this principle we crossed APP/PSEN1 transgenic mice with Gulo knockout mice unable to synthesize their own vitamin C. Experimental mice were maintained from 6 weeks of age on standard (0.33 g/L) or reduced (0.099 g/L) levels of vitamin C and then assessed for changes in behavior and neuropathology. APP/PSEN1 mice showed impaired spatial learning in the Barnes maze and water maze that was not further impacted by vitamin C level. However, long-term decreased vitamin C levels led to hyperactivity in transgenic mice, with altered locomotor habituation and increased omission errors in the Barnes maze. Decreased vitamin C also led to increased oxidative stress. Transgenic mice were more susceptible to the activity-enhancing effects of scopolamine and low vitamin C attenuated these effects in both genotypes. These data indicate an interaction between the cholinergic system and vitamin C that could be important given the cholinergic degeneration associated with Alzheimer's disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)543-552
Number of pages10
JournalPharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior
Volume94
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2010

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Ascorbic Acid Deficiency
Scopolamine Hydrobromide
Transgenic Mice
Ascorbic Acid
Cholinergic Agents
Mustelidae
Oxidative stress
Knockout Mice
Alzheimer Disease
Oxidative Stress
Antioxidants
Genotype

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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Vitamin C deficiency increases basal exploratory activity but decreases scopolamine-induced activity in APP/PSEN1 transgenic mice. / Harrison, F. E.; May, J. M.; Mcdonald, Michael.

In: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, Vol. 94, No. 4, 01.02.2010, p. 543-552.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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