Vitamin C reduces spatial learning deficits in middle-aged and very old APP/PSEN1 transgenic and wild-type mice

F. E. Harrison, A. H. Hosseini, Michael Mcdonald, J. M. May

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Alzheimer's disease is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by a build up of amyloid β (Aβ) deposits, elevated oxidative stress, and deterioration of the cholinergic system. The present study investigated short-term cognitive-enhancing effects of acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) Vitamin C (ascorbate) treatment in APP/PSEN1 mice, a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Middle-aged (12 months) and very old (24 months) APP/PSEN1 bigenic and wild-type mice were treated with ascorbate (125 mg/kg i.p.) or the vehicle 1 h before testing on Y-maze spontaneous alternation and Morris water maze tasks. Very old mice performed more poorly on cognitive tasks than middle-aged mice. Ascorbate treatment improved Y-maze alternation rates and swim accuracy in the water maze in both wild-type and APP/PSEN1 mice. Aβ deposits and oxidative stress both increased with age, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was significantly reduced in APP/PSEN1 compared to wild-type mice. However, the short course of acute ascorbate treatment did not alter Alzheimer-like neuropathological features of plaque deposition, oxidative stress, or AChE activity. These data suggest that ascorbate may have noötropic functions when administered parenterally in high doses and that the mode of action is via an acute, pharmacological-like mechanism that likely modulates neurotransmitter function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)443-450
Number of pages8
JournalPharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior
Volume93
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009

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Oxidative stress
Transgenic Mice
Ascorbic Acid
Acetylcholinesterase
Deposits
Neurodegenerative diseases
Water
Oxidative Stress
Amyloid
Cholinergic Agents
Neurotransmitter Agents
Deterioration
Alzheimer Disease
Testing
Amyloid Plaques
Spatial Learning
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Pharmacology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Vitamin C reduces spatial learning deficits in middle-aged and very old APP/PSEN1 transgenic and wild-type mice. / Harrison, F. E.; Hosseini, A. H.; Mcdonald, Michael; May, J. M.

In: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, Vol. 93, No. 4, 01.10.2009, p. 443-450.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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