Vitamin e intake and the lung cancer risk among female nonsmokers

A report from the Shanghai Women's Health Study

Qi Jun Wu, Yong Bing Xiang, Gong Yang, Hong Lan Li, Qing Lan, Yu Tang Gao, Wei Zheng, Xiao Ou Shu, Jay Fowke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vitamin E includes several tocopherol isoforms, which may reduce lung cancer risk, but past studies evaluating the association between vitamin E intake and lung cancer risk were inconsistent. We prospectively investigated the associations between tocopherol intake from diet and from supplements with lung cancer risk among 72,829 Chinese female nonsmokers aged 40-70 years and participating in the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS). Dietary and supplement tocopherol exposure was assessed by a validated food-frequency questionnaire at baseline and reassessed for change in intake during follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models with time-dependent covariates were used to calculate multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence interval (CIs) for lung cancer. After 12.02 years of follow-up, 481 women were diagnosed with lung cancer. Total dietary tocopherol was inversely associated with lung cancer risk among women meeting dietary guidelines for adequate intake (AI) of tocopherol (14 mg/day or more: HR: 0.78; 95% CI 0.60-0.99; compared with the category less than AI). The protective association between dietary tocopherol intake and lung cancer was restricted to women exposed to sidestream smoke in the home and workplace [HR50.53 (0.29-0.97), p-trend50.04]. In contrast, vitamin E supplement use was associated with increased lung cancer risk (HR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.01-1.73), more so for lung adenocarcinoma risk (HR: 1.79; 95% CI: 1.23-2.60). In summary, dietary tocopherol intake may reduce the risk of lung cancer among female nonsmokers; however, supplements may increase lung adenocarcinoma risk and requires further investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)610-617
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume136
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2015

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Women's Health
Vitamins
Tocopherols
Lung Neoplasms
Vitamin E
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Nutrition Policy
Dietary Supplements
Proportional Hazards Models
Smoke
Workplace
Protein Isoforms
Diet
Food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Vitamin e intake and the lung cancer risk among female nonsmokers : A report from the Shanghai Women's Health Study. / Wu, Qi Jun; Xiang, Yong Bing; Yang, Gong; Li, Hong Lan; Lan, Qing; Gao, Yu Tang; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao Ou; Fowke, Jay.

In: International Journal of Cancer, Vol. 136, No. 3, 15.02.2015, p. 610-617.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wu, Qi Jun ; Xiang, Yong Bing ; Yang, Gong ; Li, Hong Lan ; Lan, Qing ; Gao, Yu Tang ; Zheng, Wei ; Shu, Xiao Ou ; Fowke, Jay. / Vitamin e intake and the lung cancer risk among female nonsmokers : A report from the Shanghai Women's Health Study. In: International Journal of Cancer. 2015 ; Vol. 136, No. 3. pp. 610-617.
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abstract = "Vitamin E includes several tocopherol isoforms, which may reduce lung cancer risk, but past studies evaluating the association between vitamin E intake and lung cancer risk were inconsistent. We prospectively investigated the associations between tocopherol intake from diet and from supplements with lung cancer risk among 72,829 Chinese female nonsmokers aged 40-70 years and participating in the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS). Dietary and supplement tocopherol exposure was assessed by a validated food-frequency questionnaire at baseline and reassessed for change in intake during follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models with time-dependent covariates were used to calculate multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95{\%} confidence interval (CIs) for lung cancer. After 12.02 years of follow-up, 481 women were diagnosed with lung cancer. Total dietary tocopherol was inversely associated with lung cancer risk among women meeting dietary guidelines for adequate intake (AI) of tocopherol (14 mg/day or more: HR: 0.78; 95{\%} CI 0.60-0.99; compared with the category less than AI). The protective association between dietary tocopherol intake and lung cancer was restricted to women exposed to sidestream smoke in the home and workplace [HR50.53 (0.29-0.97), p-trend50.04]. In contrast, vitamin E supplement use was associated with increased lung cancer risk (HR: 1.33; 95{\%} CI: 1.01-1.73), more so for lung adenocarcinoma risk (HR: 1.79; 95{\%} CI: 1.23-2.60). In summary, dietary tocopherol intake may reduce the risk of lung cancer among female nonsmokers; however, supplements may increase lung adenocarcinoma risk and requires further investigation.",
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