Voluntary stuttering suppresses true stuttering

A window on the speech perception-production link

Tim Saltuklaroglu, Joseph Kalinowski, Vikram N. Dayalu, Andrew Stuart, Michael P. Rastatter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In accord with a proposed innate link between speech perception and production (e.g., motor theory), this study provides compelling evidence for the inhibition of stuttering events in people who stutter prior to the initiation of the intended speech act, via both the perception and the production of speech gestures. Stuttering frequency during reading was reduced in 10 adults who stutter by approximately 40% in three of four experimental conditions: (1) following passive audiovisual presentation (i.e., viewing and hearing) of another person producing pseudostuttering (stutter-like syllabic repetitions) and following active shadowing of both (2) pseudostuttered and (3) fluent speech. Stuttering was not inhibited during reading following passive audiovisual presentation of fluent speech. Syllabic repetitions can inhibit stuttering both when produced and when perceived, and we suggest that these elementary stuttering forms may serve as compensatory speech gestures for releasing involuntary stuttering blocks by engaging mirror neuronal systems that are predisposed for fluent gestural imitation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-254
Number of pages6
JournalPerception and Psychophysics
Volume66
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Stuttering
Speech Perception
Gestures
Reading
speech act
imitation
Hearing
human being
event
evidence
Stutter

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Voluntary stuttering suppresses true stuttering : A window on the speech perception-production link. / Saltuklaroglu, Tim; Kalinowski, Joseph; Dayalu, Vikram N.; Stuart, Andrew; Rastatter, Michael P.

In: Perception and Psychophysics, Vol. 66, No. 2, 01.01.2004, p. 249-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saltuklaroglu, Tim ; Kalinowski, Joseph ; Dayalu, Vikram N. ; Stuart, Andrew ; Rastatter, Michael P. / Voluntary stuttering suppresses true stuttering : A window on the speech perception-production link. In: Perception and Psychophysics. 2004 ; Vol. 66, No. 2. pp. 249-254.
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