Vowel generalization and its relation to adaptation during perturbations of auditory feedback

Kevin Reilly, Chelsea Pettibone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Repeated perturbations of auditory feedback during vowel production elicit changes not only in the production of the perturbed vowel (adaptation) but also in the production of nearby vowels that were not perturbed (generalization). The finding that adaptation generalizes to other, nonperturbed vowels suggests that sensorimotor representations for vowels are not independent; instead, the goals for producing any one vowel may depend in part on the goals for other vowels. The present study investigated the dependence or independence of vowel representations by evaluating adaptation and generalization in two groups of speakers exposed to auditory perturbations of their first formant (F1) during different vowels. The speakers in both groups who adapted to the perturbation exhibited generalization in two nonperturbed vowels that were produced under masking noise. Correlation testing was performed to evaluate the relations between adaptation and generalization as well as between the generalization in the two nonperturbed vowels. These tests identified significant coupling between the F1 changes of adjacent vowels but not nonadjacent vowels. The pattern of correlation findings indicates that generalization was due in part to feedforward representations that are partly shared across adjacent vowels, possibly to maintain their acoustic contrast. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Speech adaptations to alterations, or perturbations, of auditory feedback have provided important insights into sensorimotor representations underlying speech. One finding from these studies that is yet to be accounted for is vowel generalization, which describes the effects of repeated perturbations to one vowel on the production of other vowels that were not perturbed. The present study used correlation testing to quantify the effects of changes in a perturbed vowel on neighboring (i.e., similar) nonperturbed vowels. The results identified significant correlations between the changes of adjacent, but not nonadjacent, vowel pairs. This finding suggests that generalization is partly a response to adaptation and not solely due to the auditory perturbation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2925-2934
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of neurophysiology
Volume118
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 14 2017

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Acoustics
Noise

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology

Cite this

Vowel generalization and its relation to adaptation during perturbations of auditory feedback. / Reilly, Kevin; Pettibone, Chelsea.

In: Journal of neurophysiology, Vol. 118, No. 5, 14.11.2017, p. 2925-2934.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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