Waterline biofilm and the dental treatment facility

a review.

Ernest D. Pederson, Mark E. Stone, James Ragain, John W. Simecek

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biofilms are well-organized communities of cooperating microorganisms that can include bacteria, protozoa, diatoms, and fungi. Surveys of dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) indicate that biofilm formation is a universal problem and that environmental and human-derived opportunistic pathogens can be cultured consistently from biofilms retrieved from DUWLs and other dental devices. Although the health risks presented by waterline bacterial colonization have yet to be adequately addressed, professional and ethical considerations indicate that steps should be taken to improve the quality of DUWLs. To address these concerns, the Council on Scientific Affairs of the ADA recently published a list of products cleared by the FDA to control dental waterline contamination. The goal of this article is to increase the awareness of potential health risks posed by biofilm formation and provide information on techniques and devices designed to control the microbial contamination of DUWLs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGeneral Dentistry
Volume50
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dental Facilities
Biofilms
Tooth
Diatoms
Equipment and Supplies
Health
Fungi
Bacteria

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Pederson, E. D., Stone, M. E., Ragain, J., & Simecek, J. W. (2002). Waterline biofilm and the dental treatment facility: a review. General Dentistry, 50(2).

Waterline biofilm and the dental treatment facility : a review. / Pederson, Ernest D.; Stone, Mark E.; Ragain, James; Simecek, John W.

In: General Dentistry, Vol. 50, No. 2, 01.01.2002.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Pederson, ED, Stone, ME, Ragain, J & Simecek, JW 2002, 'Waterline biofilm and the dental treatment facility: a review.', General Dentistry, vol. 50, no. 2.
Pederson, Ernest D. ; Stone, Mark E. ; Ragain, James ; Simecek, John W. / Waterline biofilm and the dental treatment facility : a review. In: General Dentistry. 2002 ; Vol. 50, No. 2.
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