Weight change, weight change intention, and the incidence of mobility limitation in well-functioning community-dwelling older adults

Jung Sun Lee, Stephen B. Kritchevsky, Frances Tylavsky, Tamara Harris, Eleanor M. Simonsick, Susan M. Rubin, Anne B. Newman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Obesity increases the risk for functional decline in later years, but the functional consequences of weight change in older adults are currently unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether weight, weight change, and weight change intention are associated with risk for mobility limitation in elderly persons. Methods. This study included 2932 well-functioning black and white men and women aged 70 to 79 years, participating in the Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study, who were followed for 30 months. At baseline, reported weight change of 5 or more pounds during the previous year and weight change intention were assessed. Mobility limitation was defined as reported difficulty or inability to walk one-quarter mile or to climb 10 steps during two consecutive semiannual assessments during a period of 30 months. Results. Approximately 30% of participants developed mobility limitation. Higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with increased risk for mobility limitation. Unintentional weight loss in the previous year was associated with increased risk for mobility limitation in the extremely obese, which was defined as BMI ≥ 35 (hazard ratios [HR], = 3.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.84-7.79), and the normal BMI, which was defined as BMI 25 (HR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.80-3.60). In persons with BMI 25 to 29.9, intentional weight loss (HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.12-2.25) and weight fluctuation with any intention (HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.10-2.28) increased the risk for mobility limitation. Unintentional weight gain or fluctuation did not confer additional risk for mobility limitation compared with weight stability, regardless of the level of body weight. Conclusion. In this cohort of well-functioning elderly persons, functional consequences of past weight change depended on the type of weight change, intentionality, and current measured body weight.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1007-1012
Number of pages6
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume60
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

Mobility Limitation
Independent Living
Weights and Measures
Incidence
Body Mass Index
Confidence Intervals
Weight Loss
Body Weight
Body Composition
Weight Gain
Obesity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Weight change, weight change intention, and the incidence of mobility limitation in well-functioning community-dwelling older adults. / Lee, Jung Sun; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Tylavsky, Frances; Harris, Tamara; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Rubin, Susan M.; Newman, Anne B.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Vol. 60, No. 8, 01.01.2005, p. 1007-1012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Jung Sun ; Kritchevsky, Stephen B. ; Tylavsky, Frances ; Harris, Tamara ; Simonsick, Eleanor M. ; Rubin, Susan M. ; Newman, Anne B. / Weight change, weight change intention, and the incidence of mobility limitation in well-functioning community-dwelling older adults. In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. 2005 ; Vol. 60, No. 8. pp. 1007-1012.
@article{9bf5b2cc1215448c86f4ee91763e0590,
title = "Weight change, weight change intention, and the incidence of mobility limitation in well-functioning community-dwelling older adults",
abstract = "Background. Obesity increases the risk for functional decline in later years, but the functional consequences of weight change in older adults are currently unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether weight, weight change, and weight change intention are associated with risk for mobility limitation in elderly persons. Methods. This study included 2932 well-functioning black and white men and women aged 70 to 79 years, participating in the Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study, who were followed for 30 months. At baseline, reported weight change of 5 or more pounds during the previous year and weight change intention were assessed. Mobility limitation was defined as reported difficulty or inability to walk one-quarter mile or to climb 10 steps during two consecutive semiannual assessments during a period of 30 months. Results. Approximately 30{\%} of participants developed mobility limitation. Higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with increased risk for mobility limitation. Unintentional weight loss in the previous year was associated with increased risk for mobility limitation in the extremely obese, which was defined as BMI ≥ 35 (hazard ratios [HR], = 3.79; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.84-7.79), and the normal BMI, which was defined as BMI 25 (HR, 2.55; 95{\%} CI, 1.80-3.60). In persons with BMI 25 to 29.9, intentional weight loss (HR, 1.59; 95{\%} CI, 1.12-2.25) and weight fluctuation with any intention (HR, 1.59; 95{\%} CI, 1.10-2.28) increased the risk for mobility limitation. Unintentional weight gain or fluctuation did not confer additional risk for mobility limitation compared with weight stability, regardless of the level of body weight. Conclusion. In this cohort of well-functioning elderly persons, functional consequences of past weight change depended on the type of weight change, intentionality, and current measured body weight.",
author = "Lee, {Jung Sun} and Kritchevsky, {Stephen B.} and Frances Tylavsky and Tamara Harris and Simonsick, {Eleanor M.} and Rubin, {Susan M.} and Newman, {Anne B.}",
year = "2005",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/gerona/60.8.1007",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "60",
pages = "1007--1012",
journal = "Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences",
issn = "1079-5006",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Weight change, weight change intention, and the incidence of mobility limitation in well-functioning community-dwelling older adults

AU - Lee, Jung Sun

AU - Kritchevsky, Stephen B.

AU - Tylavsky, Frances

AU - Harris, Tamara

AU - Simonsick, Eleanor M.

AU - Rubin, Susan M.

AU - Newman, Anne B.

PY - 2005/1/1

Y1 - 2005/1/1

N2 - Background. Obesity increases the risk for functional decline in later years, but the functional consequences of weight change in older adults are currently unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether weight, weight change, and weight change intention are associated with risk for mobility limitation in elderly persons. Methods. This study included 2932 well-functioning black and white men and women aged 70 to 79 years, participating in the Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study, who were followed for 30 months. At baseline, reported weight change of 5 or more pounds during the previous year and weight change intention were assessed. Mobility limitation was defined as reported difficulty or inability to walk one-quarter mile or to climb 10 steps during two consecutive semiannual assessments during a period of 30 months. Results. Approximately 30% of participants developed mobility limitation. Higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with increased risk for mobility limitation. Unintentional weight loss in the previous year was associated with increased risk for mobility limitation in the extremely obese, which was defined as BMI ≥ 35 (hazard ratios [HR], = 3.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.84-7.79), and the normal BMI, which was defined as BMI 25 (HR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.80-3.60). In persons with BMI 25 to 29.9, intentional weight loss (HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.12-2.25) and weight fluctuation with any intention (HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.10-2.28) increased the risk for mobility limitation. Unintentional weight gain or fluctuation did not confer additional risk for mobility limitation compared with weight stability, regardless of the level of body weight. Conclusion. In this cohort of well-functioning elderly persons, functional consequences of past weight change depended on the type of weight change, intentionality, and current measured body weight.

AB - Background. Obesity increases the risk for functional decline in later years, but the functional consequences of weight change in older adults are currently unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether weight, weight change, and weight change intention are associated with risk for mobility limitation in elderly persons. Methods. This study included 2932 well-functioning black and white men and women aged 70 to 79 years, participating in the Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study, who were followed for 30 months. At baseline, reported weight change of 5 or more pounds during the previous year and weight change intention were assessed. Mobility limitation was defined as reported difficulty or inability to walk one-quarter mile or to climb 10 steps during two consecutive semiannual assessments during a period of 30 months. Results. Approximately 30% of participants developed mobility limitation. Higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with increased risk for mobility limitation. Unintentional weight loss in the previous year was associated with increased risk for mobility limitation in the extremely obese, which was defined as BMI ≥ 35 (hazard ratios [HR], = 3.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.84-7.79), and the normal BMI, which was defined as BMI 25 (HR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.80-3.60). In persons with BMI 25 to 29.9, intentional weight loss (HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.12-2.25) and weight fluctuation with any intention (HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.10-2.28) increased the risk for mobility limitation. Unintentional weight gain or fluctuation did not confer additional risk for mobility limitation compared with weight stability, regardless of the level of body weight. Conclusion. In this cohort of well-functioning elderly persons, functional consequences of past weight change depended on the type of weight change, intentionality, and current measured body weight.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=24144451743&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=24144451743&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/gerona/60.8.1007

DO - 10.1093/gerona/60.8.1007

M3 - Article

VL - 60

SP - 1007

EP - 1012

JO - Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

JF - Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

SN - 1079-5006

IS - 8

ER -