Weight loss of black, white, and Hispanic men and women in the diabetes prevention program

Delia S. West, T. Elaine Prewitt, Zoran Bursac, Holly C. Felix

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

160 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To provide the specific weight loss outcomes for African-American, Hispanic, and white men and women in the lifestyle and metformin treatment arms of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) by race-gender group to facilitate researchers translating similar interventions to minority populations, as well as provide realistic weight loss expectations for clinicians. Methods and Procedures: Secondary analyses of weight loss of 2,921 overweight participants (22% black; 17% Hispanic; 61% white; and 68% women) with impaired glucose tolerance randomized in the DPP to intensive lifestyle modification, metformin or placebo. Data over a 30-month period are examined for comparability across treatment arms by race and gender. Results: Within lifestyle treatment, all race-gender groups lost comparable amounts of weight with the exception of black women who exhibited significantly smaller weight losses (P < 0.01). For example, at 12 months, weight losses for white men (-8.4%), white women (-8.1%), Hispanic men (-7.8%), Hispanic women (-7.1%), and black men (-7.1%) were similar and significantly higher than black women (-4.5%). In contrast, within metformin treatment, all race-gender groups including black women lost similar amounts of weight. Race-gender specific mean weight loss data are provided by treatment arm for each follow-up period. Discussion: Diminished weight losses were apparent among black women in comparison with other race-gender groups in a lifestyle intervention but not metformin, underscoring the critical nature of examining sociocultural and environmental contributors to successful lifestyle intervention for black women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1413-1420
Number of pages8
JournalObesity
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008

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Hispanic Americans
Weight Loss
Metformin
Life Style
Therapeutics
hydroquinone
Weights and Measures
Glucose Intolerance
African Americans
Placebos
Research Personnel
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Weight loss of black, white, and Hispanic men and women in the diabetes prevention program. / West, Delia S.; Elaine Prewitt, T.; Bursac, Zoran; Felix, Holly C.

In: Obesity, Vol. 16, No. 6, 01.06.2008, p. 1413-1420.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

West, Delia S. ; Elaine Prewitt, T. ; Bursac, Zoran ; Felix, Holly C. / Weight loss of black, white, and Hispanic men and women in the diabetes prevention program. In: Obesity. 2008 ; Vol. 16, No. 6. pp. 1413-1420.
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