Wellness among African-American and Caucasian students attending a predominantly White institution

Michael D. Oliver, Subimal Datta, Debora R. Baldwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The wellness movement is growing on college campuses; however, the examination of race is lacking. We examined aspects of physical and emotional well-being as a function of race in 197 college students at a predominantly White institution. Results revealed racial differences on diet, F(1, 196) = 7.537, p = 0.007 and resilient coping, F(1, 196) = 8.614, p = 0.004. Furthermore, regression analyses revealed that the association between stress and coping was moderated by race (F(1, 196) = 8.196, p = 0.005), demonstrating that Whites and Blacks experience and cope with stressors in differing ways. Findings of this study suggest that race is an influential factor of wellness and subsequent well-being in college students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1637-1645
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of health psychology
Volume24
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

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African Americans
Students
Regression Analysis
Diet

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Wellness among African-American and Caucasian students attending a predominantly White institution. / Oliver, Michael D.; Datta, Subimal; Baldwin, Debora R.

In: Journal of health psychology, Vol. 24, No. 12, 01.10.2019, p. 1637-1645.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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