What makes the preparation for, or the performance of, colonoscopy (CSP) difficult?

V. K. Sharma, S. K. Chockalingam, A. Kapur, P. H. Ling, E. A. Ugheoke, E. N. Steinberg, R. Vasudeva, Colin Howden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To identify factors that may affect preparation for, or performance of, CSP. Methods: Prospective evaluation of 226 consecutive outpatients undergoing CSP (mean age: 63.8; 223 men; no prior colorectal surgery). CSP was by 1 of 6 endoscopists naïve to the fact that the following factors were being evaluated: demographics, history of prior abdominal surgery, history of constipation, CSP time and findings, technical difficulty, symptoms during preparation, symptoms during CSP, quality of prep, prep time, volume of liquid stool aspirated, and patient prep satisfaction. Numerical scores were recorded and their effect on CSP prep and performance analyzed. Results: Diverticular disease was found in 48%, history of non-colonic abdominal surgery in 50%, and constipation in 30% of patients. Constipation was present in 37% of patients with, and 23% without, prior abdominal surgery (p=0.013). 57% of patients with a history of constipation had previous CSP, compared to 41% of those without such history (p=0.03). Age, race, history of constipation, prior abdominal surgery, and the presence or severity of diverticular disease did not affect CSP findings. Multiple regression analysis showed that the volume of liquid stool aspirated during CSP, and poor prep significantly increased CSP time and technical difficulty (r=0.3; p<0.001 for all). Duration of CSP correlated with symptoms (r=0.6; p<0.001). Symptoms during prep and CSP were significantly correlated (r=0.3; p<0.001). Preparation time was inversely correlated with prep quality and patient satisfaction (r=-0.4; p<0.001 for both). Conclusions: Age, race, diverticular disease, constipation or prior abdominal surgery did not affect preparation for, or performance of, CSP. Significantly more patients with prior abdominal surgery complained of constipation. Significantly more patients with constipation had prior CSP. Volume of liquid stool encountered at CSP, and poor colonic prep, adversely affected performance. Procedure duration reduced patient tolerance. Longer preparation predicted poor prep quality and patient satisfaction. The correlation between symptoms during prep and CSP suggests increased colonic sensitivity in these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGastrointestinal Endoscopy
Volume47
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Colonoscopy
Constipation
Patient Satisfaction
Colorectal Surgery

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Sharma, V. K., Chockalingam, S. K., Kapur, A., Ling, P. H., Ugheoke, E. A., Steinberg, E. N., ... Howden, C. (1998). What makes the preparation for, or the performance of, colonoscopy (CSP) difficult? Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, 47(4).

What makes the preparation for, or the performance of, colonoscopy (CSP) difficult? / Sharma, V. K.; Chockalingam, S. K.; Kapur, A.; Ling, P. H.; Ugheoke, E. A.; Steinberg, E. N.; Vasudeva, R.; Howden, Colin.

In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Vol. 47, No. 4, 01.12.1998.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sharma, VK, Chockalingam, SK, Kapur, A, Ling, PH, Ugheoke, EA, Steinberg, EN, Vasudeva, R & Howden, C 1998, 'What makes the preparation for, or the performance of, colonoscopy (CSP) difficult?', Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, vol. 47, no. 4.
Sharma VK, Chockalingam SK, Kapur A, Ling PH, Ugheoke EA, Steinberg EN et al. What makes the preparation for, or the performance of, colonoscopy (CSP) difficult? Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 1998 Dec 1;47(4).
Sharma, V. K. ; Chockalingam, S. K. ; Kapur, A. ; Ling, P. H. ; Ugheoke, E. A. ; Steinberg, E. N. ; Vasudeva, R. ; Howden, Colin. / What makes the preparation for, or the performance of, colonoscopy (CSP) difficult?. In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 1998 ; Vol. 47, No. 4.
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abstract = "Purpose: To identify factors that may affect preparation for, or performance of, CSP. Methods: Prospective evaluation of 226 consecutive outpatients undergoing CSP (mean age: 63.8; 223 men; no prior colorectal surgery). CSP was by 1 of 6 endoscopists na{\"i}ve to the fact that the following factors were being evaluated: demographics, history of prior abdominal surgery, history of constipation, CSP time and findings, technical difficulty, symptoms during preparation, symptoms during CSP, quality of prep, prep time, volume of liquid stool aspirated, and patient prep satisfaction. Numerical scores were recorded and their effect on CSP prep and performance analyzed. Results: Diverticular disease was found in 48{\%}, history of non-colonic abdominal surgery in 50{\%}, and constipation in 30{\%} of patients. Constipation was present in 37{\%} of patients with, and 23{\%} without, prior abdominal surgery (p=0.013). 57{\%} of patients with a history of constipation had previous CSP, compared to 41{\%} of those without such history (p=0.03). Age, race, history of constipation, prior abdominal surgery, and the presence or severity of diverticular disease did not affect CSP findings. Multiple regression analysis showed that the volume of liquid stool aspirated during CSP, and poor prep significantly increased CSP time and technical difficulty (r=0.3; p<0.001 for all). Duration of CSP correlated with symptoms (r=0.6; p<0.001). Symptoms during prep and CSP were significantly correlated (r=0.3; p<0.001). Preparation time was inversely correlated with prep quality and patient satisfaction (r=-0.4; p<0.001 for both). Conclusions: Age, race, diverticular disease, constipation or prior abdominal surgery did not affect preparation for, or performance of, CSP. Significantly more patients with prior abdominal surgery complained of constipation. Significantly more patients with constipation had prior CSP. Volume of liquid stool encountered at CSP, and poor colonic prep, adversely affected performance. Procedure duration reduced patient tolerance. Longer preparation predicted poor prep quality and patient satisfaction. The correlation between symptoms during prep and CSP suggests increased colonic sensitivity in these patients.",
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T1 - What makes the preparation for, or the performance of, colonoscopy (CSP) difficult?

AU - Sharma, V. K.

AU - Chockalingam, S. K.

AU - Kapur, A.

AU - Ling, P. H.

AU - Ugheoke, E. A.

AU - Steinberg, E. N.

AU - Vasudeva, R.

AU - Howden, Colin

PY - 1998/12/1

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N2 - Purpose: To identify factors that may affect preparation for, or performance of, CSP. Methods: Prospective evaluation of 226 consecutive outpatients undergoing CSP (mean age: 63.8; 223 men; no prior colorectal surgery). CSP was by 1 of 6 endoscopists naïve to the fact that the following factors were being evaluated: demographics, history of prior abdominal surgery, history of constipation, CSP time and findings, technical difficulty, symptoms during preparation, symptoms during CSP, quality of prep, prep time, volume of liquid stool aspirated, and patient prep satisfaction. Numerical scores were recorded and their effect on CSP prep and performance analyzed. Results: Diverticular disease was found in 48%, history of non-colonic abdominal surgery in 50%, and constipation in 30% of patients. Constipation was present in 37% of patients with, and 23% without, prior abdominal surgery (p=0.013). 57% of patients with a history of constipation had previous CSP, compared to 41% of those without such history (p=0.03). Age, race, history of constipation, prior abdominal surgery, and the presence or severity of diverticular disease did not affect CSP findings. Multiple regression analysis showed that the volume of liquid stool aspirated during CSP, and poor prep significantly increased CSP time and technical difficulty (r=0.3; p<0.001 for all). Duration of CSP correlated with symptoms (r=0.6; p<0.001). Symptoms during prep and CSP were significantly correlated (r=0.3; p<0.001). Preparation time was inversely correlated with prep quality and patient satisfaction (r=-0.4; p<0.001 for both). Conclusions: Age, race, diverticular disease, constipation or prior abdominal surgery did not affect preparation for, or performance of, CSP. Significantly more patients with prior abdominal surgery complained of constipation. Significantly more patients with constipation had prior CSP. Volume of liquid stool encountered at CSP, and poor colonic prep, adversely affected performance. Procedure duration reduced patient tolerance. Longer preparation predicted poor prep quality and patient satisfaction. The correlation between symptoms during prep and CSP suggests increased colonic sensitivity in these patients.

AB - Purpose: To identify factors that may affect preparation for, or performance of, CSP. Methods: Prospective evaluation of 226 consecutive outpatients undergoing CSP (mean age: 63.8; 223 men; no prior colorectal surgery). CSP was by 1 of 6 endoscopists naïve to the fact that the following factors were being evaluated: demographics, history of prior abdominal surgery, history of constipation, CSP time and findings, technical difficulty, symptoms during preparation, symptoms during CSP, quality of prep, prep time, volume of liquid stool aspirated, and patient prep satisfaction. Numerical scores were recorded and their effect on CSP prep and performance analyzed. Results: Diverticular disease was found in 48%, history of non-colonic abdominal surgery in 50%, and constipation in 30% of patients. Constipation was present in 37% of patients with, and 23% without, prior abdominal surgery (p=0.013). 57% of patients with a history of constipation had previous CSP, compared to 41% of those without such history (p=0.03). Age, race, history of constipation, prior abdominal surgery, and the presence or severity of diverticular disease did not affect CSP findings. Multiple regression analysis showed that the volume of liquid stool aspirated during CSP, and poor prep significantly increased CSP time and technical difficulty (r=0.3; p<0.001 for all). Duration of CSP correlated with symptoms (r=0.6; p<0.001). Symptoms during prep and CSP were significantly correlated (r=0.3; p<0.001). Preparation time was inversely correlated with prep quality and patient satisfaction (r=-0.4; p<0.001 for both). Conclusions: Age, race, diverticular disease, constipation or prior abdominal surgery did not affect preparation for, or performance of, CSP. Significantly more patients with prior abdominal surgery complained of constipation. Significantly more patients with constipation had prior CSP. Volume of liquid stool encountered at CSP, and poor colonic prep, adversely affected performance. Procedure duration reduced patient tolerance. Longer preparation predicted poor prep quality and patient satisfaction. The correlation between symptoms during prep and CSP suggests increased colonic sensitivity in these patients.

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