When Chemotherapy Is Not Enough—Management of Prostatic Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma in an Infant

Christina P. Carpenter, Joseph Gleason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A baby boy was diagnosed with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma causing left hydroureteronephrosis. A loop ureterostomy was performed, and the infant was treated per the RMS13 protocol. After 3 months of chemotherapy, the infant's tumor burden increased, and he underwent radical cystoprostatectomy and right-to-left transureteroureterostomy (end-to-end fashion utilizing the distal limb of his ureterostomy). This innovative method was utilized because the infant's tumor burden was too large to be treated effectively and safely with radiation. One year later, the infant has no evidence of disease. This demonstrates that optimal management of rhabdomyosarcoma is still unknown; therefore, each child warrants an individualized approach for optimal outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)200-202
Number of pages3
JournalUrology
Volume113
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma
Ureterostomy
Drug Therapy
Tumor Burden
Rhabdomyosarcoma
Extremities
Radiation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology

Cite this

When Chemotherapy Is Not Enough—Management of Prostatic Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma in an Infant. / Carpenter, Christina P.; Gleason, Joseph.

In: Urology, Vol. 113, 01.03.2018, p. 200-202.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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