When epilepsy interferes with word comprehension

Findings in Landau-Kleffner syndrome

Eduardo M. Castillo, Ian J. Butler, James E. Baumgartner, Antony Passaro, Andrew Papanicolaou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Landau-Kleffner syndrome is characterized by a regression in receptive language. The factors that affect the clinical expression of this syndrome remain unclear. This study presents neuroimaging findings in 2 patients showing different clinical evolutions. Linguistic regression persisted in 1 patient and evolved positively in the other. In patient A (with severe linguistic regression) there was an overlap between areas engaged during word recognition and those involved in generating the epileptiform activity; in patient B (with better linguistic evolution), receptive language was predominantly represented in the right hemisphere (unaffected). Patient A underwent multiple subpial transections. The 2-year follow-up indicated linguistic improvement, absence of epileptiform activity, and activation of the left temporal cortex during word comprehension. These results suggest that the resolution of the linguistic deficit in Landau-Kleffner syndrome may be modulated by the language-specific cortex freed from interfering epileptiform activity or by reorganization of the receptive language cortex triggered by the epileptic activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-101
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Child Neurology
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

Fingerprint

Landau-Kleffner Syndrome
Linguistics
Epilepsy
Language
Temporal Lobe
Neuroimaging

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Castillo, E. M., Butler, I. J., Baumgartner, J. E., Passaro, A., & Papanicolaou, A. (2008). When epilepsy interferes with word comprehension: Findings in Landau-Kleffner syndrome. Journal of Child Neurology, 23(1), 97-101. https://doi.org/10.1177/0883073807308701

When epilepsy interferes with word comprehension : Findings in Landau-Kleffner syndrome. / Castillo, Eduardo M.; Butler, Ian J.; Baumgartner, James E.; Passaro, Antony; Papanicolaou, Andrew.

In: Journal of Child Neurology, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.01.2008, p. 97-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Castillo, EM, Butler, IJ, Baumgartner, JE, Passaro, A & Papanicolaou, A 2008, 'When epilepsy interferes with word comprehension: Findings in Landau-Kleffner syndrome', Journal of Child Neurology, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 97-101. https://doi.org/10.1177/0883073807308701
Castillo, Eduardo M. ; Butler, Ian J. ; Baumgartner, James E. ; Passaro, Antony ; Papanicolaou, Andrew. / When epilepsy interferes with word comprehension : Findings in Landau-Kleffner syndrome. In: Journal of Child Neurology. 2008 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 97-101.
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