Whole blood transcriptomics and urinary metabolomics to define adaptive biochemical pathways of high- intensity exercise in 50-60 year old masters athletes

Kamalika Mukherjee, Brittany A. Edgett, Harrison W. Burrows, Cecilia Castro, Julian L. Griffin, Adel Giaid Schwertani, Brendon J. Gurd, Colin D. Funk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Exercise is beneficial for a variety of age-related disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the beneficial adaptations to exercise in older adults are not well understood. The aim of the current study was to utilize a dual approach to characterize the genetic and metabolic adaptive pathways altered by exercise in veteran athletes and age-matched untrained individuals. Two groups of 50-60 year old males: competitive cyclists (athletes, n = 9; VO2peak 59.165.2 ml?kg21?min21; peak aerobic power 383639 W) and untrained, minimally active individuals (controls, n = 8; VO2peak 35.969.7 ml?kg21?min21; peak aerobic power 230657 W) were examined. All participants completed an acute bout of submaximal endurance exercise, and blood and urine samples pre- and post-exercise were analyzed for gene expression and metabolic changes utilizing genome-wide DNA microarray analysis and NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics, respectively. Our results indicate distinct differences in gene and metabolite expression nvolving energy metabolism, lipids, insulin signaling and cardiovascular function between the two groups. These findings may lead to new insights into beneficial signaling pathways of healthy aging and help identify surrogate markers for monitoring exercise and training load.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere92031
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 18 2014

Fingerprint

Metabolomics
athletes
metabolomics
transcriptomics
Athletes
biochemical pathways
exercise
Blood
Genes
Exercise
blood
Microarrays
Metabolites
Gene expression
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
Durability
Aging of materials
Insulin
Lipids
Monitoring

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Whole blood transcriptomics and urinary metabolomics to define adaptive biochemical pathways of high- intensity exercise in 50-60 year old masters athletes. / Mukherjee, Kamalika; Edgett, Brittany A.; Burrows, Harrison W.; Castro, Cecilia; Griffin, Julian L.; Schwertani, Adel Giaid; Gurd, Brendon J.; Funk, Colin D.

In: PloS one, Vol. 9, No. 3, e92031, 18.03.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mukherjee, Kamalika ; Edgett, Brittany A. ; Burrows, Harrison W. ; Castro, Cecilia ; Griffin, Julian L. ; Schwertani, Adel Giaid ; Gurd, Brendon J. ; Funk, Colin D. / Whole blood transcriptomics and urinary metabolomics to define adaptive biochemical pathways of high- intensity exercise in 50-60 year old masters athletes. In: PloS one. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 3.
@article{defe83768b114d2b9263ec184d8be2e4,
title = "Whole blood transcriptomics and urinary metabolomics to define adaptive biochemical pathways of high- intensity exercise in 50-60 year old masters athletes",
abstract = "Exercise is beneficial for a variety of age-related disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the beneficial adaptations to exercise in older adults are not well understood. The aim of the current study was to utilize a dual approach to characterize the genetic and metabolic adaptive pathways altered by exercise in veteran athletes and age-matched untrained individuals. Two groups of 50-60 year old males: competitive cyclists (athletes, n = 9; VO2peak 59.165.2 ml?kg21?min21; peak aerobic power 383639 W) and untrained, minimally active individuals (controls, n = 8; VO2peak 35.969.7 ml?kg21?min21; peak aerobic power 230657 W) were examined. All participants completed an acute bout of submaximal endurance exercise, and blood and urine samples pre- and post-exercise were analyzed for gene expression and metabolic changes utilizing genome-wide DNA microarray analysis and NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics, respectively. Our results indicate distinct differences in gene and metabolite expression nvolving energy metabolism, lipids, insulin signaling and cardiovascular function between the two groups. These findings may lead to new insights into beneficial signaling pathways of healthy aging and help identify surrogate markers for monitoring exercise and training load.",
author = "Kamalika Mukherjee and Edgett, {Brittany A.} and Burrows, {Harrison W.} and Cecilia Castro and Griffin, {Julian L.} and Schwertani, {Adel Giaid} and Gurd, {Brendon J.} and Funk, {Colin D.}",
year = "2014",
month = "3",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0092031",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Whole blood transcriptomics and urinary metabolomics to define adaptive biochemical pathways of high- intensity exercise in 50-60 year old masters athletes

AU - Mukherjee, Kamalika

AU - Edgett, Brittany A.

AU - Burrows, Harrison W.

AU - Castro, Cecilia

AU - Griffin, Julian L.

AU - Schwertani, Adel Giaid

AU - Gurd, Brendon J.

AU - Funk, Colin D.

PY - 2014/3/18

Y1 - 2014/3/18

N2 - Exercise is beneficial for a variety of age-related disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the beneficial adaptations to exercise in older adults are not well understood. The aim of the current study was to utilize a dual approach to characterize the genetic and metabolic adaptive pathways altered by exercise in veteran athletes and age-matched untrained individuals. Two groups of 50-60 year old males: competitive cyclists (athletes, n = 9; VO2peak 59.165.2 ml?kg21?min21; peak aerobic power 383639 W) and untrained, minimally active individuals (controls, n = 8; VO2peak 35.969.7 ml?kg21?min21; peak aerobic power 230657 W) were examined. All participants completed an acute bout of submaximal endurance exercise, and blood and urine samples pre- and post-exercise were analyzed for gene expression and metabolic changes utilizing genome-wide DNA microarray analysis and NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics, respectively. Our results indicate distinct differences in gene and metabolite expression nvolving energy metabolism, lipids, insulin signaling and cardiovascular function between the two groups. These findings may lead to new insights into beneficial signaling pathways of healthy aging and help identify surrogate markers for monitoring exercise and training load.

AB - Exercise is beneficial for a variety of age-related disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the beneficial adaptations to exercise in older adults are not well understood. The aim of the current study was to utilize a dual approach to characterize the genetic and metabolic adaptive pathways altered by exercise in veteran athletes and age-matched untrained individuals. Two groups of 50-60 year old males: competitive cyclists (athletes, n = 9; VO2peak 59.165.2 ml?kg21?min21; peak aerobic power 383639 W) and untrained, minimally active individuals (controls, n = 8; VO2peak 35.969.7 ml?kg21?min21; peak aerobic power 230657 W) were examined. All participants completed an acute bout of submaximal endurance exercise, and blood and urine samples pre- and post-exercise were analyzed for gene expression and metabolic changes utilizing genome-wide DNA microarray analysis and NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics, respectively. Our results indicate distinct differences in gene and metabolite expression nvolving energy metabolism, lipids, insulin signaling and cardiovascular function between the two groups. These findings may lead to new insights into beneficial signaling pathways of healthy aging and help identify surrogate markers for monitoring exercise and training load.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84898621392&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84898621392&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0092031

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0092031

M3 - Article

VL - 9

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 3

M1 - e92031

ER -