William M. Bass and the development of forensic anthropology in Tennessee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Twenty-two years of human identification cases have been analyzed with respect to the development of a forensic anthropology curriculum at the University of Tennessee under William M. Bass. Relationships forged with the State Medical Examiner and lecture programs for national, state and local law enforcement agencies and arson investigators have provided the necessary exposure that ensured the growth of Dr. Bass's caseload and program. Postmortem indicators for assessing time-since-death have been Bass's target research domain. The development of a donated body program with curation of those skeletons promises to keep his research perspective fueled. Finally, the formal establishment of the Forensic Anthropology Center at the University of Tennessee ensures the continued academic commitment to forensic anthropology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)741-750
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Forensic Sciences
Volume40
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bass
Forensic Anthropology
anthropology
local law
medical examiner
Firesetting Behavior
state law
law enforcement
Law Enforcement
Coroners and Medical Examiners
Research
Skeleton
Curriculum
commitment
death
curriculum
Research Personnel
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Law

Cite this

William M. Bass and the development of forensic anthropology in Tennessee. / Marks, Murray.

In: Journal of Forensic Sciences, Vol. 40, No. 5, 1995, p. 741-750.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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