Worldwide overview of critical care nursing organizations and their activities

Ged Williams, W. Chaboyer, R. Thornsteindóttir, P. Fulbrook, C. Shelton, D. Chan, Anne Alexandrov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While critical care has been a specialty within nursing for almost 50 years, with many countries having professional organizations representing these nurses, it is only recently that the formation of an international society has been considered. A three-phased study was planned: the aim of the first phase was to identify critical care organizations worldwide; the aim of the second was to describe the characteristics of these organizations, including their issues and activities; and the aim of the third was to plan for an international society, if international support was evident. In the first phase, contacts in 44 countries were identified using a number of strategies. In the second phase, 24 (55%) countries responded to a survey about their organizations. Common issues for critical care nurses were identified, including concerns over staffing levels, working conditions, educational programme standards and wages. Critical care nursing organizations were generally favourable towards the notion of establishing a World Federation of their respective societies. Some of the important issues that will need to be addressed in the lead up to the formation of such a federation are now being considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)208-217
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Nursing Review
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001

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Critical Care Nursing
Critical Care
Organizations
Nursing Specialties
Nurses
Salaries and Fringe Benefits

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Williams, G., Chaboyer, W., Thornsteindóttir, R., Fulbrook, P., Shelton, C., Chan, D., & Alexandrov, A. (2001). Worldwide overview of critical care nursing organizations and their activities. International Nursing Review, 48(4), 208-217. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1466-7657.2001.00100.x

Worldwide overview of critical care nursing organizations and their activities. / Williams, Ged; Chaboyer, W.; Thornsteindóttir, R.; Fulbrook, P.; Shelton, C.; Chan, D.; Alexandrov, Anne.

In: International Nursing Review, Vol. 48, No. 4, 01.12.2001, p. 208-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Williams, G, Chaboyer, W, Thornsteindóttir, R, Fulbrook, P, Shelton, C, Chan, D & Alexandrov, A 2001, 'Worldwide overview of critical care nursing organizations and their activities', International Nursing Review, vol. 48, no. 4, pp. 208-217. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1466-7657.2001.00100.x
Williams G, Chaboyer W, Thornsteindóttir R, Fulbrook P, Shelton C, Chan D et al. Worldwide overview of critical care nursing organizations and their activities. International Nursing Review. 2001 Dec 1;48(4):208-217. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1466-7657.2001.00100.x
Williams, Ged ; Chaboyer, W. ; Thornsteindóttir, R. ; Fulbrook, P. ; Shelton, C. ; Chan, D. ; Alexandrov, Anne. / Worldwide overview of critical care nursing organizations and their activities. In: International Nursing Review. 2001 ; Vol. 48, No. 4. pp. 208-217.
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