Younger patients report similar activity levels to older patients after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty

Jordan D. Walters, Kaku Barkoh, Richard Smith, Frederick M. Azar, Thomas W. Throckmorton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Younger patients who have undergone reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) are believed to have higher activity levels that place higher stresses across the prosthesis, increasing the risk of failure, but there is little information to support or refute this supposition. The purposes of this study were to define the patient-reported activity levels of patients younger than 65 years and older than 65 years who underwent RTSA and to evaluate any differences between the groups. Methods Forty-six patients who underwent primary RTSA answered a questionnaire regarding their activity levels. Data were categorized and tabulated according to pain, range of motion, strength, and activity level (low, medium, and high demand). Statistical analyses were performed using the Fisher exact test, χ2 test, and independent t test. Differences with P < .05 were considered statistically significant. Results Seventeen patients younger than 65 years (mean age, 57.7 years) and 29 patients older than 65 years (mean age, 75.2 years) were included. No significant differences were found for range of motion, strength, or number of activities; 47% of younger patients and 44% of older patients reported high-demand activities (P = .64); 24% of younger patients and 37% of older patients reported medium-demand use (P = .30). Patients younger than 65 years were more likely to require narcotic pain medication (P = .03) and to have disability (P = .0001). Conclusion These data provide initial evidence that commonly held concerns about higher activity levels among younger patients placing excessive demands on the RTSA prosthesis may not be as important as currently thought. Rather, patients seem to self-regulate their activities to minimize pain and maximize essential functions after surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1418-1424
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery
Volume25
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

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Arthroplasty
Articular Range of Motion
Pain
Narcotics
Prostheses and Implants

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Younger patients report similar activity levels to older patients after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. / Walters, Jordan D.; Barkoh, Kaku; Smith, Richard; Azar, Frederick M.; Throckmorton, Thomas W.

In: Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, Vol. 25, No. 9, 01.09.2016, p. 1418-1424.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Walters, Jordan D. ; Barkoh, Kaku ; Smith, Richard ; Azar, Frederick M. ; Throckmorton, Thomas W. / Younger patients report similar activity levels to older patients after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. In: Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2016 ; Vol. 25, No. 9. pp. 1418-1424.
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abstract = "Background Younger patients who have undergone reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) are believed to have higher activity levels that place higher stresses across the prosthesis, increasing the risk of failure, but there is little information to support or refute this supposition. The purposes of this study were to define the patient-reported activity levels of patients younger than 65 years and older than 65 years who underwent RTSA and to evaluate any differences between the groups. Methods Forty-six patients who underwent primary RTSA answered a questionnaire regarding their activity levels. Data were categorized and tabulated according to pain, range of motion, strength, and activity level (low, medium, and high demand). Statistical analyses were performed using the Fisher exact test, χ2 test, and independent t test. Differences with P < .05 were considered statistically significant. Results Seventeen patients younger than 65 years (mean age, 57.7 years) and 29 patients older than 65 years (mean age, 75.2 years) were included. No significant differences were found for range of motion, strength, or number of activities; 47{\%} of younger patients and 44{\%} of older patients reported high-demand activities (P = .64); 24{\%} of younger patients and 37{\%} of older patients reported medium-demand use (P = .30). Patients younger than 65 years were more likely to require narcotic pain medication (P = .03) and to have disability (P = .0001). Conclusion These data provide initial evidence that commonly held concerns about higher activity levels among younger patients placing excessive demands on the RTSA prosthesis may not be as important as currently thought. Rather, patients seem to self-regulate their activities to minimize pain and maximize essential functions after surgery.",
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N2 - Background Younger patients who have undergone reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) are believed to have higher activity levels that place higher stresses across the prosthesis, increasing the risk of failure, but there is little information to support or refute this supposition. The purposes of this study were to define the patient-reported activity levels of patients younger than 65 years and older than 65 years who underwent RTSA and to evaluate any differences between the groups. Methods Forty-six patients who underwent primary RTSA answered a questionnaire regarding their activity levels. Data were categorized and tabulated according to pain, range of motion, strength, and activity level (low, medium, and high demand). Statistical analyses were performed using the Fisher exact test, χ2 test, and independent t test. Differences with P < .05 were considered statistically significant. Results Seventeen patients younger than 65 years (mean age, 57.7 years) and 29 patients older than 65 years (mean age, 75.2 years) were included. No significant differences were found for range of motion, strength, or number of activities; 47% of younger patients and 44% of older patients reported high-demand activities (P = .64); 24% of younger patients and 37% of older patients reported medium-demand use (P = .30). Patients younger than 65 years were more likely to require narcotic pain medication (P = .03) and to have disability (P = .0001). Conclusion These data provide initial evidence that commonly held concerns about higher activity levels among younger patients placing excessive demands on the RTSA prosthesis may not be as important as currently thought. Rather, patients seem to self-regulate their activities to minimize pain and maximize essential functions after surgery.

AB - Background Younger patients who have undergone reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) are believed to have higher activity levels that place higher stresses across the prosthesis, increasing the risk of failure, but there is little information to support or refute this supposition. The purposes of this study were to define the patient-reported activity levels of patients younger than 65 years and older than 65 years who underwent RTSA and to evaluate any differences between the groups. Methods Forty-six patients who underwent primary RTSA answered a questionnaire regarding their activity levels. Data were categorized and tabulated according to pain, range of motion, strength, and activity level (low, medium, and high demand). Statistical analyses were performed using the Fisher exact test, χ2 test, and independent t test. Differences with P < .05 were considered statistically significant. Results Seventeen patients younger than 65 years (mean age, 57.7 years) and 29 patients older than 65 years (mean age, 75.2 years) were included. No significant differences were found for range of motion, strength, or number of activities; 47% of younger patients and 44% of older patients reported high-demand activities (P = .64); 24% of younger patients and 37% of older patients reported medium-demand use (P = .30). Patients younger than 65 years were more likely to require narcotic pain medication (P = .03) and to have disability (P = .0001). Conclusion These data provide initial evidence that commonly held concerns about higher activity levels among younger patients placing excessive demands on the RTSA prosthesis may not be as important as currently thought. Rather, patients seem to self-regulate their activities to minimize pain and maximize essential functions after surgery.

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